Pain sensitivity risk factors for chronic TMD: Descriptive data and empirically identified domains from the OPPERA case control study

Joel Daniel Greenspan, Gary D. Slade, Eric Bair, Ronald Dubner, Roger B. Fillingim, Richard Ohrbach, Charlie Knott, Flora Mulkey, Rebecca Rothwell, William Maixner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many studies report that people with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are more sensitive to experimental pain stimuli than TMD-free controls. Such differences in sensitivity are observed in remote body sites as well as in the orofacial region, suggesting a generalized upregulation of nociceptive processing in TMD cases. This large case-control study of 185 adults with TMD and 1,633 TMD-free controls measured sensitivity to painful pressure, mechanical cutaneous, and heat stimuli, using multiple testing protocols. Based on an unprecedented 36 experimental pain measures, 28 showed statistically significantly greater pain sensitivity in TMD cases than controls. The largest effects were seen for pressure pain thresholds at multiple body sites and cutaneous mechanical pain threshold. The other mechanical cutaneous pain measures and many of the heat pain measures showed significant differences, but with lesser effect sizes. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the pain measures derived from 1,633 controls identified 5 components labeled: 1) heat pain ratings; 2) heat pain aftersensations and tolerance; 3) mechanical cutaneous pain sensitivity; 4) pressure pain thresholds; and 5) heat pain temporal summation. These results demonstrate that compared to TMD-free controls, chronic TMD cases are more sensitive to many experimental noxious stimuli at extracranial body sites, and provide for the first time the ability to directly compare the case-control effect sizes of a wide range of pain sensitivity measures. Perspective: This article describes experimental pain sensitivity differences between a large sample of people with chronic TMD and non-TMD controls, using multiple stimulus modalities and measures. Variability in the magnitude and consistency of case-control differences highlight the need to consider multiple testing measures to adequately assess pain processing alterations in chronic pain conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume12
Issue number11 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Case-Control Studies
Pain
Hot Temperature
Pain Threshold
Skin
Pressure
Aptitude
Principal Component Analysis
Chronic Pain

Keywords

  • chronic facial pain
  • heat pain
  • mechanical pain
  • pressure pain
  • QST

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Pain sensitivity risk factors for chronic TMD : Descriptive data and empirically identified domains from the OPPERA case control study. / Greenspan, Joel Daniel; Slade, Gary D.; Bair, Eric; Dubner, Ronald; Fillingim, Roger B.; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charlie; Mulkey, Flora; Rothwell, Rebecca; Maixner, William.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 12, No. 11 SUPPL., 11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenspan, JD, Slade, GD, Bair, E, Dubner, R, Fillingim, RB, Ohrbach, R, Knott, C, Mulkey, F, Rothwell, R & Maixner, W 2011, 'Pain sensitivity risk factors for chronic TMD: Descriptive data and empirically identified domains from the OPPERA case control study', Journal of Pain, vol. 12, no. 11 SUPPL.. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2011.08.006
Greenspan, Joel Daniel ; Slade, Gary D. ; Bair, Eric ; Dubner, Ronald ; Fillingim, Roger B. ; Ohrbach, Richard ; Knott, Charlie ; Mulkey, Flora ; Rothwell, Rebecca ; Maixner, William. / Pain sensitivity risk factors for chronic TMD : Descriptive data and empirically identified domains from the OPPERA case control study. In: Journal of Pain. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 11 SUPPL.
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