Pain coping but not readiness to change is associated with pretreatment pain-related functioning

Patrick Hamilton Finan, John W. Burns, Mark P. Jensen, Warren R. Nielson, Robert D. Kerns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine if readiness to use adaptive and avoid maladaptive pain-coping skills before initiation of psychosocial treatment for chronic pain was related to reports of present coping, and whether those variables, together or separately, explained variance in pain, pain interference, and symptoms of depression. Methods: A total of 132 patients with chronic low back pain completed measures of readiness, coping, and pain-related functioning before participation in a clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain. Results: Pearson correlations indicated that the content-matched subscales of readiness and coping were moderately correlated (rs between 0.30 and 0.60), and "mismatched" subscales were generally more weakly related or unrelated. None of the readiness subscales were significantly associated with variance in any of the functioning variables. However, several aspects of coping were significantly associated with functioning. Task persistence was associated with lower pain interference and symptoms of depression; asking for assistance was associated with higher pain interference; and pain-contingent rest was associated with higher pain interference. Discussion: Overall, the results indicate that adaptive coping is associated with better pain-related functioning and maladaptive coping is associated with poorer functioning, whereas readiness appears to not play a significant role in patient functioning before psychosocial pain treatment. The findings support the discriminant validity of the coping and readiness measures and inform treatment conceptualization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-692
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Pain
Depression
Psychological Adaptation
Cognitive Therapy
Low Back Pain
Chronic Pain
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • functioning
  • pain coping
  • readiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Pain coping but not readiness to change is associated with pretreatment pain-related functioning. / Finan, Patrick Hamilton; Burns, John W.; Jensen, Mark P.; Nielson, Warren R.; Kerns, Robert D.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 28, No. 8, 10.2012, p. 687-692.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Finan, Patrick Hamilton ; Burns, John W. ; Jensen, Mark P. ; Nielson, Warren R. ; Kerns, Robert D. / Pain coping but not readiness to change is associated with pretreatment pain-related functioning. In: Clinical Journal of Pain. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 8. pp. 687-692.
@article{ceb47ab155014334be77dffc0b0d3986,
title = "Pain coping but not readiness to change is associated with pretreatment pain-related functioning",
abstract = "Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine if readiness to use adaptive and avoid maladaptive pain-coping skills before initiation of psychosocial treatment for chronic pain was related to reports of present coping, and whether those variables, together or separately, explained variance in pain, pain interference, and symptoms of depression. Methods: A total of 132 patients with chronic low back pain completed measures of readiness, coping, and pain-related functioning before participation in a clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain. Results: Pearson correlations indicated that the content-matched subscales of readiness and coping were moderately correlated (rs between 0.30 and 0.60), and {"}mismatched{"} subscales were generally more weakly related or unrelated. None of the readiness subscales were significantly associated with variance in any of the functioning variables. However, several aspects of coping were significantly associated with functioning. Task persistence was associated with lower pain interference and symptoms of depression; asking for assistance was associated with higher pain interference; and pain-contingent rest was associated with higher pain interference. Discussion: Overall, the results indicate that adaptive coping is associated with better pain-related functioning and maladaptive coping is associated with poorer functioning, whereas readiness appears to not play a significant role in patient functioning before psychosocial pain treatment. The findings support the discriminant validity of the coping and readiness measures and inform treatment conceptualization.",
keywords = "chronic pain, functioning, pain coping, readiness",
author = "Finan, {Patrick Hamilton} and Burns, {John W.} and Jensen, {Mark P.} and Nielson, {Warren R.} and Kerns, {Robert D.}",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1097/AJP.0b013e3182400867",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "687--692",
journal = "Clinical Journal of Pain",
issn = "0749-8047",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pain coping but not readiness to change is associated with pretreatment pain-related functioning

AU - Finan, Patrick Hamilton

AU - Burns, John W.

AU - Jensen, Mark P.

AU - Nielson, Warren R.

AU - Kerns, Robert D.

PY - 2012/10

Y1 - 2012/10

N2 - Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine if readiness to use adaptive and avoid maladaptive pain-coping skills before initiation of psychosocial treatment for chronic pain was related to reports of present coping, and whether those variables, together or separately, explained variance in pain, pain interference, and symptoms of depression. Methods: A total of 132 patients with chronic low back pain completed measures of readiness, coping, and pain-related functioning before participation in a clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain. Results: Pearson correlations indicated that the content-matched subscales of readiness and coping were moderately correlated (rs between 0.30 and 0.60), and "mismatched" subscales were generally more weakly related or unrelated. None of the readiness subscales were significantly associated with variance in any of the functioning variables. However, several aspects of coping were significantly associated with functioning. Task persistence was associated with lower pain interference and symptoms of depression; asking for assistance was associated with higher pain interference; and pain-contingent rest was associated with higher pain interference. Discussion: Overall, the results indicate that adaptive coping is associated with better pain-related functioning and maladaptive coping is associated with poorer functioning, whereas readiness appears to not play a significant role in patient functioning before psychosocial pain treatment. The findings support the discriminant validity of the coping and readiness measures and inform treatment conceptualization.

AB - Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine if readiness to use adaptive and avoid maladaptive pain-coping skills before initiation of psychosocial treatment for chronic pain was related to reports of present coping, and whether those variables, together or separately, explained variance in pain, pain interference, and symptoms of depression. Methods: A total of 132 patients with chronic low back pain completed measures of readiness, coping, and pain-related functioning before participation in a clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain. Results: Pearson correlations indicated that the content-matched subscales of readiness and coping were moderately correlated (rs between 0.30 and 0.60), and "mismatched" subscales were generally more weakly related or unrelated. None of the readiness subscales were significantly associated with variance in any of the functioning variables. However, several aspects of coping were significantly associated with functioning. Task persistence was associated with lower pain interference and symptoms of depression; asking for assistance was associated with higher pain interference; and pain-contingent rest was associated with higher pain interference. Discussion: Overall, the results indicate that adaptive coping is associated with better pain-related functioning and maladaptive coping is associated with poorer functioning, whereas readiness appears to not play a significant role in patient functioning before psychosocial pain treatment. The findings support the discriminant validity of the coping and readiness measures and inform treatment conceptualization.

KW - chronic pain

KW - functioning

KW - pain coping

KW - readiness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865619784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865619784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/AJP.0b013e3182400867

DO - 10.1097/AJP.0b013e3182400867

M3 - Article

C2 - 22688600

AN - SCOPUS:84865619784

VL - 28

SP - 687

EP - 692

JO - Clinical Journal of Pain

JF - Clinical Journal of Pain

SN - 0749-8047

IS - 8

ER -