Paediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest: Factors associated with survival and neurobehavioural outcome one year later

Kathleen Meert, Russell Telford, Richard Holubkov, Beth S Slomine, James R Christensen, John Berger, George Ofori-Amanfo, Christopher J.L. Newth, J. Michael Dean, Frank W. Moler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To investigate clinical characteristics associated with 12-month survival and neurobehavioural function among children recruited to the Therapeutic Hypothermia after Paediatric Cardiac Arrest In-Hospital trial. Methods Children (n = 329) with in-hospital cardiac arrest who received chest compressions for ≥2 min, were comatose, and required mechanical ventilation after return of circulation were included. Neurobehavioural function was assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales, second edition (VABS-II) at baseline (reflecting pre-arrest status) and 12 months post-arrest. Norms for VABS-II are 100 (mean) ±15 (SD). Higher scores indicate better functioning. Outcomes included 12-month survival, 12-month survival with VABS-II decreased by ≤15 points from baseline, and 12-month survival with VABS-II ≥70. Results Asystole as the initial arrest rhythm, administration of >4 adrenaline doses, and higher post-arrest blood lactate concentration were independently associated with lower 12-month survival; an adrenaline dosing interval of 3–<5 min and open chest compressions were independently associated with greater 12-month survival. Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and higher blood lactate were independently associated with lower 12-month survival with VABS-II decreased by ≤15 points from baseline; open chest compressions was independently associated with greater 12-month survival with VABS-II decreased by ≤15 points. Asystole as the initial rhythm, use of ECMO, and higher blood lactate were independently associated with lower 12-month survival with VABS-II ≥70; open chest compressions was independently associated with greater 12-month survival with VABS-II ≥70. Conclusions Cardiac arrest and resuscitation factors are associated with long-term survival and neurobehavioural function among children who are comatose after in-hospital arrest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-105
Number of pages10
JournalResuscitation
Volume124
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

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Keywords

  • In-hospital cardiac arrest
  • Neurobehavioural outcome
  • Paediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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