Overexpression of neuropeptide Y in the dorsomedial hypothalamus increases trial initiation but does not significantly alter concentration-dependent licking to sucrose in a brief-access taste test

Yada Treesukosol, Sheng Bi, Timothy H. Moran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Evidence in the literature raises the possibility that alterations in neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) may contribute to hyperphagia leading to body weight gain. Previously, we have shown that compared to AAVGFP controls, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH of lean rats resulted in significantly higher body weight gain that was attributed to increased food intake, and this was further exacerbated by a high-fat diet. Here, we tested AAVNPY and AAVGFP control rats in a brief-access taste procedure (10-s trials, 30-min sessions) to an array of sucrose concentrations under ad libitum and partial food and water access conditions. The test allows for some segregation of the behavioral components by providing a measure of trial initiation (appetitive) and unconditioned licks at each concentration (consummatory). Consistent with previous findings suggesting that NPY has a primary effect on appetitive function, overexpression of DMH NPY did not significantly alter concentration-dependent licking response to sucrose but when tested in a non-restricted food and water schedule, AAVNPY rats initiated significantly more sucrose trials compared to AAVGFP controls in a brief-access taste test.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-114
Number of pages6
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume110-111
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 7 2013

Keywords

  • Adeno-associated virus
  • Appetitive
  • Hypothalamus
  • NPY
  • Sucrose
  • Taste

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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