Over-the-counter cough and cold medications in children

Are they helpful?

Edward A. Bell, David E Tunkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Over-the-counter cough/cold medications are commonly used in children. Recent recommendations by the Food and Drug Administration and changes to product labeling by cough/cold product manufacturers have reduced use of these products in children younger than four years of age. Data from controlled clinical trials of cough/cold product ingredients do not support their efficacy in young children. Serious adverse effects have been reported from cough/cold product use in infants and children, which largely result from inappropriate use by caregivers. Conservative therapies, including nasal suctioning, humidification, and nasal saline, should be recommended over cough/cold product use for infants and children. Otolaryngologists should educate caregivers of children on the safe and effective use of these products and therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-650
Number of pages4
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume142
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Cough
Nose
Caregivers
Product Labeling
Controlled Clinical Trials
United States Food and Drug Administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Over-the-counter cough and cold medications in children : Are they helpful? / Bell, Edward A.; Tunkel, David E.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 142, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 647-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7484b57aaf01441eb7cd10ec19ec2f93,
title = "Over-the-counter cough and cold medications in children: Are they helpful?",
abstract = "Over-the-counter cough/cold medications are commonly used in children. Recent recommendations by the Food and Drug Administration and changes to product labeling by cough/cold product manufacturers have reduced use of these products in children younger than four years of age. Data from controlled clinical trials of cough/cold product ingredients do not support their efficacy in young children. Serious adverse effects have been reported from cough/cold product use in infants and children, which largely result from inappropriate use by caregivers. Conservative therapies, including nasal suctioning, humidification, and nasal saline, should be recommended over cough/cold product use for infants and children. Otolaryngologists should educate caregivers of children on the safe and effective use of these products and therapies.",
author = "Bell, {Edward A.} and Tunkel, {David E}",
year = "2010",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.otohns.2010.01.019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "142",
pages = "647--650",
journal = "Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery",
issn = "0194-5998",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Over-the-counter cough and cold medications in children

T2 - Are they helpful?

AU - Bell, Edward A.

AU - Tunkel, David E

PY - 2010/5

Y1 - 2010/5

N2 - Over-the-counter cough/cold medications are commonly used in children. Recent recommendations by the Food and Drug Administration and changes to product labeling by cough/cold product manufacturers have reduced use of these products in children younger than four years of age. Data from controlled clinical trials of cough/cold product ingredients do not support their efficacy in young children. Serious adverse effects have been reported from cough/cold product use in infants and children, which largely result from inappropriate use by caregivers. Conservative therapies, including nasal suctioning, humidification, and nasal saline, should be recommended over cough/cold product use for infants and children. Otolaryngologists should educate caregivers of children on the safe and effective use of these products and therapies.

AB - Over-the-counter cough/cold medications are commonly used in children. Recent recommendations by the Food and Drug Administration and changes to product labeling by cough/cold product manufacturers have reduced use of these products in children younger than four years of age. Data from controlled clinical trials of cough/cold product ingredients do not support their efficacy in young children. Serious adverse effects have been reported from cough/cold product use in infants and children, which largely result from inappropriate use by caregivers. Conservative therapies, including nasal suctioning, humidification, and nasal saline, should be recommended over cough/cold product use for infants and children. Otolaryngologists should educate caregivers of children on the safe and effective use of these products and therapies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951927395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951927395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.otohns.2010.01.019

DO - 10.1016/j.otohns.2010.01.019

M3 - Article

VL - 142

SP - 647

EP - 650

JO - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

JF - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SN - 0194-5998

IS - 5

ER -