Outcomes of effective transmission of electronic prenatal records from the office to the hospital

Nancy Pham-Thomas, Nigel Pereira, Anna Powell, Damien J. Croft, Daniel S. Guilfoil, Owen C. Montgomery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the outcomes associated with improved transmission of prenatal test results between the outpatient and inpatient obstetric setting after implementation of an electronic prenatal record system. METHODS: Admission paper charts of patients admitted to our labor and delivery unit were reviewed before and after implementation of an electronic prenatal record system. The availability of maternal hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology on admission, the occurrence of repeat hepatitis B surface antigen and rapid HIV blood testing, and the occurrence of hepatitis B immunoglobulin administration to the newborns of mothers without available hepatitis B serology was recorded. Fisher's exact tests were performed to determine differences in availability of prenatal test results, the occurrence of repeat blood testing, and the occurrence of immunoglobulin administration before and after implementation. RESULTS: A total of 460 admission charts were reviewed, 229 preimplementation and 231 postimplementation. Of the preimplementation charts, 78.2% contained maternal hepatitis B and HIV serology results, whereas all postimplementation charts contained such results (P<.001). Although repeat hepatitis B surface antigen testing was performed in 3.1% of patients preimplementation, no patients required repeat testing postimplementation (P=.007). Similarly, rapid HIV blood testing was performed in 3.5% of patients preimplementation, but no patients required repeat testing postimplementation (P=.003). Increased availability of testing results prevented unnecessary administration of hepatitis B immunoglobulin postimplementation. CONCLUSION: Implementation of an electronic perinatal record system was associated with improved transmission of prenatal test results between the outpatient and inpatient obstetric setting and a decreased rate of unnecessary maternal testing and newborn interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-322
Number of pages6
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume124
Issue number2 PART1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis B
Serology
Mothers
HIV
Immunoglobulins
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Obstetrics
Inpatients
Outpatients
Newborn Infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Outcomes of effective transmission of electronic prenatal records from the office to the hospital. / Pham-Thomas, Nancy; Pereira, Nigel; Powell, Anna; Croft, Damien J.; Guilfoil, Daniel S.; Montgomery, Owen C.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 124, No. 2 PART1, 01.01.2014, p. 317-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pham-Thomas, Nancy ; Pereira, Nigel ; Powell, Anna ; Croft, Damien J. ; Guilfoil, Daniel S. ; Montgomery, Owen C. / Outcomes of effective transmission of electronic prenatal records from the office to the hospital. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2014 ; Vol. 124, No. 2 PART1. pp. 317-322.
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