Outcomes of a statewide learning collaborative to implement mental health services in pediatric primary care

Rebecca A. Baum, Melissa A. King, Lawrence S Wissow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Mental health concerns are common in pediatric primary care, but practitioners report low levels of comfort managing them. A primary care intervention addressing organizational and individual factors was developed to improve the management of common mental health conditions. Methods: Twenty-nine practices participated in a statewide learning collaborative over 18 months. On-site training was used to teach communication and brief intervention skills and develop an organizational context supportive of mental health. Clinician confidence was measured pre- and postintervention. Medicaid claims data were used to estimate the intervention’s effects on identification of mental health conditions and prescribing practices. Results: Mean clinician confidence scores increased by 20% (95% confidence interval [CI]=15% to 25%), from 2.92 at baseline to 3.55 postintervention. In the first month of the preintervention year, 6.65% of patients with an office visit had at least one visit for a mental health condition, rising to 9% postintervention; this trend was driven by detection and treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Rates of prescribing ADHD medication to patients with visits for ADHD increased by 0.12 percentage points per month (CI=0.02 to 0.22, p=0.022). Rates of prescribing second-generation antipsychotics to all patients with office visits decreased by 0.014 percentage points per month (CI=–.03 to –.00, p=0.028), relative to preintervention trends. Conclusions: This study suggests that a multicomponent intervention addressing individual staff and organizational factors together can promote identification and treatment of child mental health conditions in primary care. Future research is required to better understand the core components, impact on health outcomes, and sustainability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Mental Health Services
Primary Health Care
Mental Health
Learning
Pediatrics
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Office Visits
Confidence Intervals
Medicaid
Antipsychotic Agents
Communication
Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Outcomes of a statewide learning collaborative to implement mental health services in pediatric primary care. / Baum, Rebecca A.; King, Melissa A.; Wissow, Lawrence S.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 70, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 123-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baum, Rebecca A. ; King, Melissa A. ; Wissow, Lawrence S. / Outcomes of a statewide learning collaborative to implement mental health services in pediatric primary care. In: Psychiatric Services. 2019 ; Vol. 70, No. 2. pp. 123-129.
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