Outcomes and complications of iris-fixated intraocular lenses in cases with inadequate capsular support and complex ophthalmic history

Daliya Dzhaber, Osama M. Mustafa, Jing Tian, Jacob T. Cox, Yassine J. Daoud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: To report the indications, visual outcomes, and intra-operative and post-operative complications of iris-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes with inadequate capsular support and complex ocular history. Methods: A chart review and data analysis of eyes that underwent iris fixation of posterior chamber (PC) IOL for correction of aphakia, dislocated and subluxed IOLs, ectopia lentis, and IOL exchange. Data included clinical risk factors, associated eye conditions, previous surgeries, and concomitant procedures. The pre-operative and post-operative vision, manifest refraction, endothelial cell density, intraocular pressure (IOP), as well as intra-operative and post-operative complications were also recorded. Results: One hundred and seventeen eyes from 114 patients were examined with a mean follow-up of 22.4 months. The most common identifiable predisposing risk factor was high myopia in 23 eyes. A significant improvement in uncorrected and best corrected visual acuity compared with baseline was observed. The most common post-operative complications included recurrent IOL subluxation in 16 (13.7%) eyes, IOP spike in 7 (5.9%) eyes, cystoid macular oedema in 5 (4.3%) eyes, and epiretinal membrane formation in 4 (3.4%) eyes. There was one (0.85%) case of sterile endophthalmitis. Conclusions: Iris suture fixation of PC IOLs is a good treatment option for eyes with inadequate capsular support and complex ocular history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1875-1882
Number of pages8
JournalEye (Basingstoke)
Volume34
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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