Outcomes after unstable pertrochanteric femur fracture: intermediate versus long cephalomedullary nails

Sorawut Thamyongkit, James S. MacKenzie, Norachart Sirisreetreerux, Babar Shafiq, Erik Anton Hasenboehler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Optimal cephalomedullary nail (CMN) length for unstable pertrochanteric femur fractures is controversial. Long CMNs (L-CMNs) are currently recommended; however, intermediate-length CMNs (I-CMNs) may provide stable fixation without the additional surgical steps required by L-CMNs. We analyzed outcomes after unstable pertrochanteric femur fractures treated with L-CMNs or I-CMNs to determine whether functional outcomes, perioperative measures, complications, and mortality and reoperation rates differ by CMN length. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records at our institution for 100 patients who received surgical treatment for pertrochanteric femur fractures from June 2014 to June 2016. Data from 43 unstable pertrochanteric femur fractures treated with L-CMNs (n = 25) or I-CMNs (n = 18) were analyzed. We evaluated operative time, fluoroscopy time, intraoperative blood loss, blood transfusions, and perioperative complications; peri-implant fracture, malunion, reoperation, and death; and neck–shaft angle, tip–apex distance, and 6-month postoperative functional scores. We analyzed categorical data with Fisher exact tests and continuous data with Student t tests. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The I-CMN group had shorter operative time (68 versus 92 min; P = 0.048), shorter fluoroscopy time (72 versus 110 s; P = 0.019), and less intraoperative blood loss (80 versus 168 mL; P < 0.001) than the L-CMN group. The groups were similar in rates of blood transfusion, perioperative complications, peri-implant fracture, malunion, reoperation, and death. Six-month postoperative functional scores were similar between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: We found operative advantages of I-CMNs over L-CMNs with no difference in treatment outcomes. Level of evidence: Level IV, Retrospective case series study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEuropean Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Blood loss
  • Fracture pattern
  • Optimal cephalomedullary nail
  • Pertrochanteric femur fracture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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