Outbreak of murine infection with Clostridium difficile associated with the administration of a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet

Theresa Mau, Samantha S. Eckley, Ingrid L. Bergin, Katie Saund, Jason S. Villano, Kimberly C. Vendrov, Evan S. Snitkin, Vincent B. Young, Raymond Yung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Between October 2016 and June 2017, a C57BL/6J mouse colony that was undergoing a pre- and perinatal methyl donor supplementation diet intervention to study the impact of parental nutrition on offspring susceptibility to disease was found to suffer from an epizootic of unexpected deaths. Necropsy revealed the presence of severe colitis, and further investigation linked these outbreak deaths to a Clostridium difficile strain of ribotype 027 that we term 16N203. C. difficile infection (CDI) is associated with antibiotic use in humans. Current murine models of CDI rely on antibiotic pretreatment to establish clinical phenotypes. In this report, the C. difficile outbreak occurs in F1 mice linked to alterations in the parental diet. The diagnosis of CDI in the affected mice was confirmed by cecal/colonic histopathology, the presence of C. difficile bacteria in fecal/colonic culture, and detection of C. difficile toxins. F1 mice from parents fed the methyl supplementation diet also had significantly reduced survival (P < 0.0001) compared with F1 mice from parents fed the control diet. When we tested the 16N203 outbreak strain in an established mouse model of antibiotic-induced CDI, we confirmed that this strain is pathogenic. Our serendipitous observations from this spontaneous outbreak of C. difficile in association with a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet suggest the important role that diet may play in host defense and CDI risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00138-19
JournalmSphere
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Clostridium difficile
Disease Outbreaks
Diet
Clostridium Infections
Infection
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Ribotyping
Disease Susceptibility
Colitis
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Bacteria
Phenotype
Survival

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • Mouse
  • Outbreak
  • Veterinary epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Outbreak of murine infection with Clostridium difficile associated with the administration of a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet. / Mau, Theresa; Eckley, Samantha S.; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Saund, Katie; Villano, Jason S.; Vendrov, Kimberly C.; Snitkin, Evan S.; Young, Vincent B.; Yung, Raymond.

In: mSphere, Vol. 4, No. 2, e00138-19, 01.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mau, Theresa ; Eckley, Samantha S. ; Bergin, Ingrid L. ; Saund, Katie ; Villano, Jason S. ; Vendrov, Kimberly C. ; Snitkin, Evan S. ; Young, Vincent B. ; Yung, Raymond. / Outbreak of murine infection with Clostridium difficile associated with the administration of a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet. In: mSphere. 2019 ; Vol. 4, No. 2.
@article{855a3e1eb10445509672581db2e5d6d1,
title = "Outbreak of murine infection with Clostridium difficile associated with the administration of a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet",
abstract = "Between October 2016 and June 2017, a C57BL/6J mouse colony that was undergoing a pre- and perinatal methyl donor supplementation diet intervention to study the impact of parental nutrition on offspring susceptibility to disease was found to suffer from an epizootic of unexpected deaths. Necropsy revealed the presence of severe colitis, and further investigation linked these outbreak deaths to a Clostridium difficile strain of ribotype 027 that we term 16N203. C. difficile infection (CDI) is associated with antibiotic use in humans. Current murine models of CDI rely on antibiotic pretreatment to establish clinical phenotypes. In this report, the C. difficile outbreak occurs in F1 mice linked to alterations in the parental diet. The diagnosis of CDI in the affected mice was confirmed by cecal/colonic histopathology, the presence of C. difficile bacteria in fecal/colonic culture, and detection of C. difficile toxins. F1 mice from parents fed the methyl supplementation diet also had significantly reduced survival (P < 0.0001) compared with F1 mice from parents fed the control diet. When we tested the 16N203 outbreak strain in an established mouse model of antibiotic-induced CDI, we confirmed that this strain is pathogenic. Our serendipitous observations from this spontaneous outbreak of C. difficile in association with a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet suggest the important role that diet may play in host defense and CDI risk factors.",
keywords = "Clostridium difficile, Mouse, Outbreak, Veterinary epidemiology",
author = "Theresa Mau and Eckley, {Samantha S.} and Bergin, {Ingrid L.} and Katie Saund and Villano, {Jason S.} and Vendrov, {Kimberly C.} and Snitkin, {Evan S.} and Young, {Vincent B.} and Raymond Yung",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/mSphereDirect.00138-19",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
journal = "mSphere",
issn = "2379-5042",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outbreak of murine infection with Clostridium difficile associated with the administration of a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet

AU - Mau, Theresa

AU - Eckley, Samantha S.

AU - Bergin, Ingrid L.

AU - Saund, Katie

AU - Villano, Jason S.

AU - Vendrov, Kimberly C.

AU - Snitkin, Evan S.

AU - Young, Vincent B.

AU - Yung, Raymond

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Between October 2016 and June 2017, a C57BL/6J mouse colony that was undergoing a pre- and perinatal methyl donor supplementation diet intervention to study the impact of parental nutrition on offspring susceptibility to disease was found to suffer from an epizootic of unexpected deaths. Necropsy revealed the presence of severe colitis, and further investigation linked these outbreak deaths to a Clostridium difficile strain of ribotype 027 that we term 16N203. C. difficile infection (CDI) is associated with antibiotic use in humans. Current murine models of CDI rely on antibiotic pretreatment to establish clinical phenotypes. In this report, the C. difficile outbreak occurs in F1 mice linked to alterations in the parental diet. The diagnosis of CDI in the affected mice was confirmed by cecal/colonic histopathology, the presence of C. difficile bacteria in fecal/colonic culture, and detection of C. difficile toxins. F1 mice from parents fed the methyl supplementation diet also had significantly reduced survival (P < 0.0001) compared with F1 mice from parents fed the control diet. When we tested the 16N203 outbreak strain in an established mouse model of antibiotic-induced CDI, we confirmed that this strain is pathogenic. Our serendipitous observations from this spontaneous outbreak of C. difficile in association with a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet suggest the important role that diet may play in host defense and CDI risk factors.

AB - Between October 2016 and June 2017, a C57BL/6J mouse colony that was undergoing a pre- and perinatal methyl donor supplementation diet intervention to study the impact of parental nutrition on offspring susceptibility to disease was found to suffer from an epizootic of unexpected deaths. Necropsy revealed the presence of severe colitis, and further investigation linked these outbreak deaths to a Clostridium difficile strain of ribotype 027 that we term 16N203. C. difficile infection (CDI) is associated with antibiotic use in humans. Current murine models of CDI rely on antibiotic pretreatment to establish clinical phenotypes. In this report, the C. difficile outbreak occurs in F1 mice linked to alterations in the parental diet. The diagnosis of CDI in the affected mice was confirmed by cecal/colonic histopathology, the presence of C. difficile bacteria in fecal/colonic culture, and detection of C. difficile toxins. F1 mice from parents fed the methyl supplementation diet also had significantly reduced survival (P < 0.0001) compared with F1 mice from parents fed the control diet. When we tested the 16N203 outbreak strain in an established mouse model of antibiotic-induced CDI, we confirmed that this strain is pathogenic. Our serendipitous observations from this spontaneous outbreak of C. difficile in association with a pre- and perinatal methyl donor diet suggest the important role that diet may play in host defense and CDI risk factors.

KW - Clostridium difficile

KW - Mouse

KW - Outbreak

KW - Veterinary epidemiology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063650099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063650099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/mSphereDirect.00138-19

DO - 10.1128/mSphereDirect.00138-19

M3 - Article

C2 - 30894434

AN - SCOPUS:85063650099

VL - 4

JO - mSphere

JF - mSphere

SN - 2379-5042

IS - 2

M1 - e00138-19

ER -