Osteonecrosis of the humeral head

Kevin L. Harreld, David R. Marker, Ethan R. Wiesler, Babar Shafiq, Michael A. Mont

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Osteonecrosis of the humeral head is considerably less common than osteonecrosis of the hip. However, as in the hip, the interaction between a genetic predisposition and certain risk factors may lead to increased intraosseous pressure, loss of circulation, andeventual bone death. The most common risk factor remains corticosteroid use, which accounts for most reported cases. Radiographic staging and measurement of lesion size are predictive of disease progression and can be used to determine appropriate intervention. Recent studies have reported the use of various treatment modalities such as pharmacologics, core decompression with small-diameter drilling, arthroscopic-assisted core decompression, and bone grafting. Prospective, randomized studies are needed to determine the efficacy of these joint-preserving procedures. Newer resurfacing techniques have a role in treating articular surface loss. Hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty are recommended for patients with end-stage disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-355
Number of pages11
JournalThe Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume17
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Humeral Head
Osteonecrosis
Decompression
Hip
Joints
Hemiarthroplasty
Bone Transplantation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Arthroplasty
Disease Progression
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Prospective Studies
Pressure
Bone and Bones
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Harreld, K. L., Marker, D. R., Wiesler, E. R., Shafiq, B., & Mont, M. A. (2009). Osteonecrosis of the humeral head. The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 17(6), 345-355.

Osteonecrosis of the humeral head. / Harreld, Kevin L.; Marker, David R.; Wiesler, Ethan R.; Shafiq, Babar; Mont, Michael A.

In: The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Vol. 17, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 345-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harreld, KL, Marker, DR, Wiesler, ER, Shafiq, B & Mont, MA 2009, 'Osteonecrosis of the humeral head', The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 345-355.
Harreld KL, Marker DR, Wiesler ER, Shafiq B, Mont MA. Osteonecrosis of the humeral head. The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2009 Jun;17(6):345-355.
Harreld, Kevin L. ; Marker, David R. ; Wiesler, Ethan R. ; Shafiq, Babar ; Mont, Michael A. / Osteonecrosis of the humeral head. In: The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2009 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 345-355.
@article{fbfaa67efd664a40b7c354756a134ab3,
title = "Osteonecrosis of the humeral head",
abstract = "Osteonecrosis of the humeral head is considerably less common than osteonecrosis of the hip. However, as in the hip, the interaction between a genetic predisposition and certain risk factors may lead to increased intraosseous pressure, loss of circulation, andeventual bone death. The most common risk factor remains corticosteroid use, which accounts for most reported cases. Radiographic staging and measurement of lesion size are predictive of disease progression and can be used to determine appropriate intervention. Recent studies have reported the use of various treatment modalities such as pharmacologics, core decompression with small-diameter drilling, arthroscopic-assisted core decompression, and bone grafting. Prospective, randomized studies are needed to determine the efficacy of these joint-preserving procedures. Newer resurfacing techniques have a role in treating articular surface loss. Hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty are recommended for patients with end-stage disease.",
author = "Harreld, {Kevin L.} and Marker, {David R.} and Wiesler, {Ethan R.} and Babar Shafiq and Mont, {Michael A.}",
year = "2009",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "345--355",
journal = "The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons",
issn = "1067-151X",
publisher = "American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Osteonecrosis of the humeral head

AU - Harreld, Kevin L.

AU - Marker, David R.

AU - Wiesler, Ethan R.

AU - Shafiq, Babar

AU - Mont, Michael A.

PY - 2009/6

Y1 - 2009/6

N2 - Osteonecrosis of the humeral head is considerably less common than osteonecrosis of the hip. However, as in the hip, the interaction between a genetic predisposition and certain risk factors may lead to increased intraosseous pressure, loss of circulation, andeventual bone death. The most common risk factor remains corticosteroid use, which accounts for most reported cases. Radiographic staging and measurement of lesion size are predictive of disease progression and can be used to determine appropriate intervention. Recent studies have reported the use of various treatment modalities such as pharmacologics, core decompression with small-diameter drilling, arthroscopic-assisted core decompression, and bone grafting. Prospective, randomized studies are needed to determine the efficacy of these joint-preserving procedures. Newer resurfacing techniques have a role in treating articular surface loss. Hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty are recommended for patients with end-stage disease.

AB - Osteonecrosis of the humeral head is considerably less common than osteonecrosis of the hip. However, as in the hip, the interaction between a genetic predisposition and certain risk factors may lead to increased intraosseous pressure, loss of circulation, andeventual bone death. The most common risk factor remains corticosteroid use, which accounts for most reported cases. Radiographic staging and measurement of lesion size are predictive of disease progression and can be used to determine appropriate intervention. Recent studies have reported the use of various treatment modalities such as pharmacologics, core decompression with small-diameter drilling, arthroscopic-assisted core decompression, and bone grafting. Prospective, randomized studies are needed to determine the efficacy of these joint-preserving procedures. Newer resurfacing techniques have a role in treating articular surface loss. Hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty are recommended for patients with end-stage disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70149086539&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70149086539&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 19474444

AN - SCOPUS:70149086539

VL - 17

SP - 345

EP - 355

JO - The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

JF - The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

SN - 1067-151X

IS - 6

ER -