Osteonecrosis in pediatric cancer survivors: Epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment

Sandesh S. Rao, Jad M. El Abiad, Varun Puvanesarajah, Adam Levin, Lynne C Jones, Carol D Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Several treatment regimens for childhood malignancies have been associated with the development of osteonecrosis, including radiation therapy, glucocorticoid medications, immunotherapy (including anti-angiogenic agents), and several chemotherapeutic agents. Adolescents older than 10 years are at greatest risk of developing osteonecrosis within 1 year of initiating therapy. Screening with magnetic resonance imaging in this high-risk population may be a useful method for detecting osteonecrosis. Surgery may be required for lesions that have progressed substantially despite nonoperative interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-221
Number of pages8
JournalSurgical Oncology
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

Fingerprint

Osteonecrosis
Epidemiology
Pediatrics
Neoplasms
Immunotherapy
Glucocorticoids
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Population

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy
  • Late effects
  • Osteonecrosis
  • Pediatric cancer
  • Radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Osteonecrosis in pediatric cancer survivors : Epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. / Rao, Sandesh S.; El Abiad, Jad M.; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Levin, Adam; Jones, Lynne C; Morris, Carol D.

In: Surgical Oncology, Vol. 28, 01.03.2019, p. 214-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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