Orthostatic hypotension predicts mortality in middle-aged adults

The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

Kathryn M. Rose, Marsha L. Eigenbrodt, Rebecca L. Biga, David J. Couper, Kathleen C. Light, A. Richey Sharrett, Gerardo Heiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND - An association between orthostatic hypotension (OH) and mortality has been reported, but studies are limited to older adults or high-risk populations. METHODS AND RESULTS - We investigated the association between OH (a decrease of 20 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure or a decrease of 10 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure on standing) and 13-year mortality among middle-aged black and white men and women from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1987-1989). At baseline, 674 participants (5%) had OH. All-cause mortality was higher among those with (13.7%) than without (4.2%) OH. After we controlled for ethnicity, gender, and age, the hazard ratio (HR) for OH for all-cause mortality was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1 to 2.8). Adjustment for risk factors for cardiovascular disease and mortality and selected health conditions at baseline attenuated but did not completely explain this association (HR=1.7; 95% CI, 1.4 to 2.0). This association persisted among subsets that (1) excluded those who died within the first 2 years of follow-up and (2) were limited to those without coronary heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, hypertension, or fair/poor perceived health status at baseline. In analyses by causes of death, a significant increased hazard of death among those with versus without OH persisted after adjustment for risk factors for cardiovascular disease (HR=2.0; 95% CI, 1.6 to 2.7) and other deaths (HR=2.1; 95% CI, 1.6 to 2.8) but not for cancer (odds ratio=1.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.6). CONCLUSIONS - OH predicts mortality in middle-aged adults. This association is only partly explained by traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)630-636
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation
Volume114
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

Fingerprint

Orthostatic Hypotension
Atherosclerosis
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Blood Pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Neoplasms
Health Status
Coronary Disease
Cause of Death
Stroke
Odds Ratio
Hypertension
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Hypotension
  • Middle aged
  • Mortality
  • Orthostatic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Rose, K. M., Eigenbrodt, M. L., Biga, R. L., Couper, D. J., Light, K. C., Sharrett, A. R., & Heiss, G. (2006). Orthostatic hypotension predicts mortality in middle-aged adults: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Circulation, 114(7), 630-636. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.598722

Orthostatic hypotension predicts mortality in middle-aged adults : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. / Rose, Kathryn M.; Eigenbrodt, Marsha L.; Biga, Rebecca L.; Couper, David J.; Light, Kathleen C.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Heiss, Gerardo.

In: Circulation, Vol. 114, No. 7, 08.2006, p. 630-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rose, KM, Eigenbrodt, ML, Biga, RL, Couper, DJ, Light, KC, Sharrett, AR & Heiss, G 2006, 'Orthostatic hypotension predicts mortality in middle-aged adults: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study', Circulation, vol. 114, no. 7, pp. 630-636. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.598722
Rose, Kathryn M. ; Eigenbrodt, Marsha L. ; Biga, Rebecca L. ; Couper, David J. ; Light, Kathleen C. ; Sharrett, A. Richey ; Heiss, Gerardo. / Orthostatic hypotension predicts mortality in middle-aged adults : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. In: Circulation. 2006 ; Vol. 114, No. 7. pp. 630-636.
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