Organization and plasticity of GABA neurons and receptors in monkey visual cortex

Stewart H Hendry, R. K. Carder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The GABA neurons of monkey area 17 are a morphologically and chemically heterogeneous population of interneurons that are normally distributed most densely within the geniculocortical recipient zones of the visual cortex. In adult monkeys deprived of visual input from one eye, the levels of immunoreactivity for GABA and GAD within neurons of these geniculocortical zones is reduced. Similar changes are seen in the levels of proteins that make up the GABA(A) receptor sub-type. The effects of monocular deprivation on other substances suggest that specific types of GABA neurons, such as those in which the tachykinin neuropeptide family and parvalbumin coexist with GABA, are greatly influenced by changes in visual input. That some proteins remain normal within deprived-eye neurons and that other proteins are increased indicates the changes in the GABA cells of the cortex are not the result of a general reduction in protein synthesis. Comparisons of what is known about the morphological and synaptic features of GABA cells in area 17 and the characteristics of cells affected by monocular deprivation suggests that certain classes, such as the clutch cell, may be preferential targets of deprivation. Such a selective loss of certain GABA neurons would have broad implications for the possible physiological plasticity of cortical cells, for if ongoing studies determine that specific receptive field properties are affected by monocular deprivation in adults, the correlation of functional properties and classes of GABA cells would be possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-502
Number of pages26
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume90
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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GABAergic Neurons
GABA Receptors
Visual Cortex
Haplorhini
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Proteins
Neurons
Tachykinins
Parvalbumins
Interneurons
GABA-A Receptors
Neuropeptides
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Organization and plasticity of GABA neurons and receptors in monkey visual cortex. / Hendry, Stewart H; Carder, R. K.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 90, 1992, p. 477-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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