Oral ondansetron for the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis: A large, multicenter, double-blind, randomized comparative trial of ondansetron versus placebo

Rudolph M. Navari, Stefan Madajewicz, Norwood Anderson, Nerses S. Tchekmedyian, William Whaley, Harinder Garewal, Thomas M. Beck, Alex Y. Chang, Bernard Greenberg, Kenneth C. Caldwell, David H. Huffman, James R. Gould, Graham Carron, Michael Ossi, Elaine M. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of oral ondansetron in the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis in patients who do not require rescue antiemetic therapy for acute emesis. Patients and Methods: Five hundred thirty-eight chemotherapy-naive patients who received cisplatin chemotherapy (≥ 70 mg/m2), and who were not rescued for acute emesis, were eligible to be randomized to receive one of three oral regimens to control delayed emesis. Group I received placebo on days 2 to 6; group II received ondansetron 8 mg twice daily on days 2 and 3 and placebo on days 4 to 6; group III received ondansetron 8 mg twice daily on days 2 to 6. All patients received intravenous ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg every 4 hours for three doses) for the control of acute emesis on day 1. The number of emetic episodes on days 2 and 3 combined (days 2/3, when incidence and severity of delayed emesis were expected to be greatest) was considered the primary measure of efficacy. Results: Patients who received odansetron had significantly fewer emetic episodes on days 2/3, 4, and 5 than those who received placebo (P ≤ .002 on each day). Additionally, significantly more patients who received ondansetron had a complete plus major response (C + MR; ≤ two emetic episodes) than those who received placebo on days 2/3 (56% v 37%, P = .001), 4 (94% v 85%, P = .005), and 5 (98% v 88%, P = .006). Patients who received ondansetron had significantly less nausea on day 2/3 when day-1 nausea was used as the baseline score (P = .025). Patients who received ondansetron also had significantly less nausea on day 4 (P = .042) and the results approached significance on day 5 (P = .066). Conclusion: Oral ondansetron had a significant effect in the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis and nausea in patients who had not required rescue antiemetics during the acute emesis period. The control of delayed nausea and vomiting was most notable in the immediate 2 days following cisplatin administration, with the clinical difference narrowing between the two treatment arms on subsequent days.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2408-2416
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Oral ondansetron for the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis: A large, multicenter, double-blind, randomized comparative trial of ondansetron versus placebo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Navari, R. M., Madajewicz, S., Anderson, N., Tchekmedyian, N. S., Whaley, W., Garewal, H., Beck, T. M., Chang, A. Y., Greenberg, B., Caldwell, K. C., Huffman, D. H., Gould, J. R., Carron, G., Ossi, M., & Anderson, E. M. (1995). Oral ondansetron for the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis: A large, multicenter, double-blind, randomized comparative trial of ondansetron versus placebo. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 13(9), 2408-2416. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.1995.13.9.2408