Estudos de saúde bucal na coorte de nascimentos de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, 1993: Metodologia e resultados principais

Translated title of the contribution: Oral health follow-up studies in the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohort study: Methodology and principal results

Marco A. Peres, Aluísio Jardim Barros, Karen Glazer Peres, Cora Luiza Araújo, Ana M B Menezes, Pedro C. Hallal, Cesar G. Victora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to describe oral health follow-up studies nested in a birth cohort. A population- based birth cohort was launched in 1993 in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Two oral health follow-up studies were conducted at six (n = 359) and 12 (n = 339) years of age. A high response rate was observed at 12 years of age; 94.4% of the children examined at six years of age were restudied in 2005. The mean DMF-T index at age 12 was 1.2 (SD = 1.6) for the entire sample, ranging from 0.6 (SD = 1.1) for children that were caries-free at age six, 1.3 (SD = 1.5) for those with 1-3 carious teeth at six years, and 1.8 (SD = 1.8) for those with 4-19 carious teeth at six years (p <0.01). The number of individuals with severe malocclusions at 12 years was proportional to the number of malocclusions at six years. Oral health problems in early adolescence were more prevalent in individuals with dental problems at six years of age.

Translated title of the contributionOral health follow-up studies in the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohort study: Methodology and principal results
Original languagePortuguese
Pages (from-to)1990-1999
Number of pages10
JournalCadernos de saúde pública / Ministério da Saúde, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública.
Volume26
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Cohort studies
  • Oral health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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