Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A multicentre randomized controlled trial

Amit X. Garg, P. J. Devereaux, Andrew Hill, Manish Sood, Bharat Aggarwal, Luc Dubois, Swapnil Hiremath, Randolph Guzman, Vikram Iyer, Matthew James, Eric McArthur, Louise Moist, George Ouellet, Chirag Parikh, Virginia Schumann, Sumit Sharan, Heather Thiessen Philbrook, Sheldon Tobe, Ron Wald, Michael WalshMatthew Weir, Neesh Pannu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Curcumin, a popular herbal supplement from the plant turmeric, has prevented ischemic reperfusion and toxin-induced injury in many animal studies and a singlecentre randomized human trial. We sought to test whether perioperative oral curcumin (compared with plac ebo) affects the inflammatory response and risk of postrepair complications after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in humans. METHODS: We conducted a parallelgroup, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of patients from 10 hospitals in Canada who were scheduled to undergo elective repair of an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (November 2011 to November 2014). Patients in the treatment group received perioperative oral curcumin (2000-mg doses 8 times over 4 d). Patients, health care providers and local research staff were unaware of the treatment assignment. The primary outcomes were median concentrations of 4 biomarkers indicating injury and inflammation (postoperative urine interleukin-18 and perioperative rise in serum creatinine, plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and plasma highsensitivity C-reactive protein). RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar in the 2 groups (606 patients overall; median age 76 yr). More than 85% of patients in each group took more than 80% of their scheduled capsules. Neither curcumin nor placebo significantly affected any of the 4 biomarkers (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Regarding the secondary outcomes, there was a higher risk of acute kidney injury with curcumin than with placebo (17% v. 10%, p = 0.01), but no between-group difference in the median length of hospital stay (5 v. 5 days, p > 0.9) or the risk of clinical events (9% v. 9%, p = 0.9). INTERPRETATION: Curcumin had no beneficial effects when used in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. These findings emphasize the importance of testing turmeric and curcumin before espousing their health benefits, as is currently done in the popular media.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1273-E1280
JournalCMAJ
Volume190
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 2018

Fingerprint

Curcumin
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Randomized Controlled Trials
Curcuma
Placebos
Length of Stay
Biomarkers
Interleukin-18
Brain Natriuretic Peptide
Wounds and Injuries
Insurance Benefits
Acute Kidney Injury
Health Personnel
C-Reactive Protein
Reperfusion
Canada
Capsules
Creatinine
Patient Care
Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Garg, A. X., Devereaux, P. J., Hill, A., Sood, M., Aggarwal, B., Dubois, L., ... Pannu, N. (2018). Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A multicentre randomized controlled trial. CMAJ, 190(43), E1273-E1280. https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.180510

Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair : A multicentre randomized controlled trial. / Garg, Amit X.; Devereaux, P. J.; Hill, Andrew; Sood, Manish; Aggarwal, Bharat; Dubois, Luc; Hiremath, Swapnil; Guzman, Randolph; Iyer, Vikram; James, Matthew; McArthur, Eric; Moist, Louise; Ouellet, George; Parikh, Chirag; Schumann, Virginia; Sharan, Sumit; Thiessen Philbrook, Heather; Tobe, Sheldon; Wald, Ron; Walsh, Michael; Weir, Matthew; Pannu, Neesh.

In: CMAJ, Vol. 190, No. 43, 29.10.2018, p. E1273-E1280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garg, AX, Devereaux, PJ, Hill, A, Sood, M, Aggarwal, B, Dubois, L, Hiremath, S, Guzman, R, Iyer, V, James, M, McArthur, E, Moist, L, Ouellet, G, Parikh, C, Schumann, V, Sharan, S, Thiessen Philbrook, H, Tobe, S, Wald, R, Walsh, M, Weir, M & Pannu, N 2018, 'Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A multicentre randomized controlled trial', CMAJ, vol. 190, no. 43, pp. E1273-E1280. https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.180510
Garg AX, Devereaux PJ, Hill A, Sood M, Aggarwal B, Dubois L et al. Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A multicentre randomized controlled trial. CMAJ. 2018 Oct 29;190(43):E1273-E1280. https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.180510
Garg, Amit X. ; Devereaux, P. J. ; Hill, Andrew ; Sood, Manish ; Aggarwal, Bharat ; Dubois, Luc ; Hiremath, Swapnil ; Guzman, Randolph ; Iyer, Vikram ; James, Matthew ; McArthur, Eric ; Moist, Louise ; Ouellet, George ; Parikh, Chirag ; Schumann, Virginia ; Sharan, Sumit ; Thiessen Philbrook, Heather ; Tobe, Sheldon ; Wald, Ron ; Walsh, Michael ; Weir, Matthew ; Pannu, Neesh. / Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair : A multicentre randomized controlled trial. In: CMAJ. 2018 ; Vol. 190, No. 43. pp. E1273-E1280.
@article{7490c126b2674ff49f88a2e20e50d6c0,
title = "Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A multicentre randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Curcumin, a popular herbal supplement from the plant turmeric, has prevented ischemic reperfusion and toxin-induced injury in many animal studies and a singlecentre randomized human trial. We sought to test whether perioperative oral curcumin (compared with plac ebo) affects the inflammatory response and risk of postrepair complications after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in humans. METHODS: We conducted a parallelgroup, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of patients from 10 hospitals in Canada who were scheduled to undergo elective repair of an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (November 2011 to November 2014). Patients in the treatment group received perioperative oral curcumin (2000-mg doses 8 times over 4 d). Patients, health care providers and local research staff were unaware of the treatment assignment. The primary outcomes were median concentrations of 4 biomarkers indicating injury and inflammation (postoperative urine interleukin-18 and perioperative rise in serum creatinine, plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and plasma highsensitivity C-reactive protein). RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar in the 2 groups (606 patients overall; median age 76 yr). More than 85{\%} of patients in each group took more than 80{\%} of their scheduled capsules. Neither curcumin nor placebo significantly affected any of the 4 biomarkers (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Regarding the secondary outcomes, there was a higher risk of acute kidney injury with curcumin than with placebo (17{\%} v. 10{\%}, p = 0.01), but no between-group difference in the median length of hospital stay (5 v. 5 days, p > 0.9) or the risk of clinical events (9{\%} v. 9{\%}, p = 0.9). INTERPRETATION: Curcumin had no beneficial effects when used in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. These findings emphasize the importance of testing turmeric and curcumin before espousing their health benefits, as is currently done in the popular media.",
author = "Garg, {Amit X.} and Devereaux, {P. J.} and Andrew Hill and Manish Sood and Bharat Aggarwal and Luc Dubois and Swapnil Hiremath and Randolph Guzman and Vikram Iyer and Matthew James and Eric McArthur and Louise Moist and George Ouellet and Chirag Parikh and Virginia Schumann and Sumit Sharan and {Thiessen Philbrook}, Heather and Sheldon Tobe and Ron Wald and Michael Walsh and Matthew Weir and Neesh Pannu",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1503/cmaj.180510",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "190",
pages = "E1273--E1280",
journal = "Canadian Medical Association journal",
issn = "0008-4409",
publisher = "Canadian Medical Association",
number = "43",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral curcumin in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

T2 - A multicentre randomized controlled trial

AU - Garg, Amit X.

AU - Devereaux, P. J.

AU - Hill, Andrew

AU - Sood, Manish

AU - Aggarwal, Bharat

AU - Dubois, Luc

AU - Hiremath, Swapnil

AU - Guzman, Randolph

AU - Iyer, Vikram

AU - James, Matthew

AU - McArthur, Eric

AU - Moist, Louise

AU - Ouellet, George

AU - Parikh, Chirag

AU - Schumann, Virginia

AU - Sharan, Sumit

AU - Thiessen Philbrook, Heather

AU - Tobe, Sheldon

AU - Wald, Ron

AU - Walsh, Michael

AU - Weir, Matthew

AU - Pannu, Neesh

PY - 2018/10/29

Y1 - 2018/10/29

N2 - BACKGROUND: Curcumin, a popular herbal supplement from the plant turmeric, has prevented ischemic reperfusion and toxin-induced injury in many animal studies and a singlecentre randomized human trial. We sought to test whether perioperative oral curcumin (compared with plac ebo) affects the inflammatory response and risk of postrepair complications after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in humans. METHODS: We conducted a parallelgroup, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of patients from 10 hospitals in Canada who were scheduled to undergo elective repair of an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (November 2011 to November 2014). Patients in the treatment group received perioperative oral curcumin (2000-mg doses 8 times over 4 d). Patients, health care providers and local research staff were unaware of the treatment assignment. The primary outcomes were median concentrations of 4 biomarkers indicating injury and inflammation (postoperative urine interleukin-18 and perioperative rise in serum creatinine, plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and plasma highsensitivity C-reactive protein). RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar in the 2 groups (606 patients overall; median age 76 yr). More than 85% of patients in each group took more than 80% of their scheduled capsules. Neither curcumin nor placebo significantly affected any of the 4 biomarkers (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Regarding the secondary outcomes, there was a higher risk of acute kidney injury with curcumin than with placebo (17% v. 10%, p = 0.01), but no between-group difference in the median length of hospital stay (5 v. 5 days, p > 0.9) or the risk of clinical events (9% v. 9%, p = 0.9). INTERPRETATION: Curcumin had no beneficial effects when used in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. These findings emphasize the importance of testing turmeric and curcumin before espousing their health benefits, as is currently done in the popular media.

AB - BACKGROUND: Curcumin, a popular herbal supplement from the plant turmeric, has prevented ischemic reperfusion and toxin-induced injury in many animal studies and a singlecentre randomized human trial. We sought to test whether perioperative oral curcumin (compared with plac ebo) affects the inflammatory response and risk of postrepair complications after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in humans. METHODS: We conducted a parallelgroup, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of patients from 10 hospitals in Canada who were scheduled to undergo elective repair of an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (November 2011 to November 2014). Patients in the treatment group received perioperative oral curcumin (2000-mg doses 8 times over 4 d). Patients, health care providers and local research staff were unaware of the treatment assignment. The primary outcomes were median concentrations of 4 biomarkers indicating injury and inflammation (postoperative urine interleukin-18 and perioperative rise in serum creatinine, plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and plasma highsensitivity C-reactive protein). RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar in the 2 groups (606 patients overall; median age 76 yr). More than 85% of patients in each group took more than 80% of their scheduled capsules. Neither curcumin nor placebo significantly affected any of the 4 biomarkers (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Regarding the secondary outcomes, there was a higher risk of acute kidney injury with curcumin than with placebo (17% v. 10%, p = 0.01), but no between-group difference in the median length of hospital stay (5 v. 5 days, p > 0.9) or the risk of clinical events (9% v. 9%, p = 0.9). INTERPRETATION: Curcumin had no beneficial effects when used in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. These findings emphasize the importance of testing turmeric and curcumin before espousing their health benefits, as is currently done in the popular media.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055612695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85055612695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1503/cmaj.180510

DO - 10.1503/cmaj.180510

M3 - Article

C2 - 30373740

AN - SCOPUS:85055612695

VL - 190

SP - E1273-E1280

JO - Canadian Medical Association journal

JF - Canadian Medical Association journal

SN - 0008-4409

IS - 43

ER -