Oral cefixime is similar to continued intravenous antibiotics in the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic children with cancer

J. L. Shenep, P. M. Flynn, D. K. Baker, S. V. Hetherington, M. M. Hudson, W. T. Hughes, C. C. Patrick, P. K. Roberson, J. T. Sandlund, V. M. Santana, J. W. Sixbey, K. S. Slobod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Empiric oral antibiotic therapy for febrile neutropenic cancer patients has been suggested as a means to decrease hospitalization, but the safety of this approach has not been adequately studied in children. We compared continued iv antibiotic therapy with switching treatment to orally administered cefixime in a group of selected febrile neutropenic children for whom blood cultures were sterile after 48 h of incubation. Two hundred episodes of febrile neutropenia were studied (156 patients), and 100 episodes were randomized to receive each treatment. Failure to respond to therapy was defined by documented or suspected bacterial infection, recurrent fever, or discontinuation of assigned therapy for any reason before neutropenia resolved. Rates of treatment failure were similar in the oral cefixime group (28%) and in the iv antibiotic group (27%; P = 1.0). Results support the safety of oral cefixime therapy for low-risk febrile neutropenic children, a therapeutic approach that would facilitate earlier outpatient management and decrease the costs of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-43
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cefixime
Fever
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Safety
Febrile Neutropenia
Neutropenia
Treatment Failure
Bacterial Infections
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Shenep, J. L., Flynn, P. M., Baker, D. K., Hetherington, S. V., Hudson, M. M., Hughes, W. T., ... Slobod, K. S. (2001). Oral cefixime is similar to continued intravenous antibiotics in the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic children with cancer. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 32(1), 36-43. https://doi.org/10.1086/317552

Oral cefixime is similar to continued intravenous antibiotics in the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic children with cancer. / Shenep, J. L.; Flynn, P. M.; Baker, D. K.; Hetherington, S. V.; Hudson, M. M.; Hughes, W. T.; Patrick, C. C.; Roberson, P. K.; Sandlund, J. T.; Santana, V. M.; Sixbey, J. W.; Slobod, K. S.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2001, p. 36-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shenep, JL, Flynn, PM, Baker, DK, Hetherington, SV, Hudson, MM, Hughes, WT, Patrick, CC, Roberson, PK, Sandlund, JT, Santana, VM, Sixbey, JW & Slobod, KS 2001, 'Oral cefixime is similar to continued intravenous antibiotics in the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic children with cancer', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 36-43. https://doi.org/10.1086/317552
Shenep, J. L. ; Flynn, P. M. ; Baker, D. K. ; Hetherington, S. V. ; Hudson, M. M. ; Hughes, W. T. ; Patrick, C. C. ; Roberson, P. K. ; Sandlund, J. T. ; Santana, V. M. ; Sixbey, J. W. ; Slobod, K. S. / Oral cefixime is similar to continued intravenous antibiotics in the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic children with cancer. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2001 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 36-43.
@article{f37ebe27672b41daa5e792074b485af3,
title = "Oral cefixime is similar to continued intravenous antibiotics in the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic children with cancer",
abstract = "Empiric oral antibiotic therapy for febrile neutropenic cancer patients has been suggested as a means to decrease hospitalization, but the safety of this approach has not been adequately studied in children. We compared continued iv antibiotic therapy with switching treatment to orally administered cefixime in a group of selected febrile neutropenic children for whom blood cultures were sterile after 48 h of incubation. Two hundred episodes of febrile neutropenia were studied (156 patients), and 100 episodes were randomized to receive each treatment. Failure to respond to therapy was defined by documented or suspected bacterial infection, recurrent fever, or discontinuation of assigned therapy for any reason before neutropenia resolved. Rates of treatment failure were similar in the oral cefixime group (28{\%}) and in the iv antibiotic group (27{\%}; P = 1.0). Results support the safety of oral cefixime therapy for low-risk febrile neutropenic children, a therapeutic approach that would facilitate earlier outpatient management and decrease the costs of treatment.",
author = "Shenep, {J. L.} and Flynn, {P. M.} and Baker, {D. K.} and Hetherington, {S. V.} and Hudson, {M. M.} and Hughes, {W. T.} and Patrick, {C. C.} and Roberson, {P. K.} and Sandlund, {J. T.} and Santana, {V. M.} and Sixbey, {J. W.} and Slobod, {K. S.}",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1086/317552",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "36--43",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral cefixime is similar to continued intravenous antibiotics in the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic children with cancer

AU - Shenep, J. L.

AU - Flynn, P. M.

AU - Baker, D. K.

AU - Hetherington, S. V.

AU - Hudson, M. M.

AU - Hughes, W. T.

AU - Patrick, C. C.

AU - Roberson, P. K.

AU - Sandlund, J. T.

AU - Santana, V. M.

AU - Sixbey, J. W.

AU - Slobod, K. S.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Empiric oral antibiotic therapy for febrile neutropenic cancer patients has been suggested as a means to decrease hospitalization, but the safety of this approach has not been adequately studied in children. We compared continued iv antibiotic therapy with switching treatment to orally administered cefixime in a group of selected febrile neutropenic children for whom blood cultures were sterile after 48 h of incubation. Two hundred episodes of febrile neutropenia were studied (156 patients), and 100 episodes were randomized to receive each treatment. Failure to respond to therapy was defined by documented or suspected bacterial infection, recurrent fever, or discontinuation of assigned therapy for any reason before neutropenia resolved. Rates of treatment failure were similar in the oral cefixime group (28%) and in the iv antibiotic group (27%; P = 1.0). Results support the safety of oral cefixime therapy for low-risk febrile neutropenic children, a therapeutic approach that would facilitate earlier outpatient management and decrease the costs of treatment.

AB - Empiric oral antibiotic therapy for febrile neutropenic cancer patients has been suggested as a means to decrease hospitalization, but the safety of this approach has not been adequately studied in children. We compared continued iv antibiotic therapy with switching treatment to orally administered cefixime in a group of selected febrile neutropenic children for whom blood cultures were sterile after 48 h of incubation. Two hundred episodes of febrile neutropenia were studied (156 patients), and 100 episodes were randomized to receive each treatment. Failure to respond to therapy was defined by documented or suspected bacterial infection, recurrent fever, or discontinuation of assigned therapy for any reason before neutropenia resolved. Rates of treatment failure were similar in the oral cefixime group (28%) and in the iv antibiotic group (27%; P = 1.0). Results support the safety of oral cefixime therapy for low-risk febrile neutropenic children, a therapeutic approach that would facilitate earlier outpatient management and decrease the costs of treatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035130417&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035130417&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/317552

DO - 10.1086/317552

M3 - Article

C2 - 11112678

AN - SCOPUS:0035130417

VL - 32

SP - 36

EP - 43

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

IS - 1

ER -