Oral administration of cyclosporin does not prevent expansion of antigen-specific, gut-associated, and spleen lymphocyte populations during Chlamydia trachomatis proctitis in nonhuman primates

Martin Zeitz, Thomas C. Quinn, Alan S. Graeff, Roland Schwarting, Stephen P. James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To study the effects of oral cyclosporin (CsA) administration on immune responses in the gastrointestinal tract, humoral and cellular immune responses were studied in CsA-treated nonhuman primates having Chlamydia trachomatis proctitis (lymphogranuloma venereum, LGV). There was no apparent effect of CsA treatment on the gross or microscopic appearance of LGV proctitis, but CsA-treated animals, with or without LGV infection, had lymphoid hyperplasia of spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. CsA treatment inhibited the primary antibody response to LGV, inhibited peripheral blood lymphocyte mitogen-induced proliferation and IL-2 production, and inhibited LGV-specific proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. In contrast, mitogen-stimulated proliferation of spleen, mesenteric lymph node, and lamina propria lymphocytes was not significantly inhibited in CsA-treated animals. In addition, LGV-specific proliferation of spleen and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes was not inhibited. High mitogen-stimulated IL-2 production of lamina propria lymphocytes was only partially inhibited in CsA-treated animals. In vitro CsA treatment had the expected inhibitory effects on mitogen- and antigen-induced proliferation of spleen and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes. Thus, although oral cyclosporin inhibits the antibody and proliferative responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to antigens and mitogens in animals having Chlamydia trachomatis proctitis, it does not prevent the expansion of antigen-specific, gut-associated, and spleen lymphocyte populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-595
Number of pages11
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • cyclosporin
  • intestinal lymphocytes
  • lymphogranuloma venereum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

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