Optimizing treatment outcomes in HIV-infected patients with substance abuse issues

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Drug abuse is associated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Limited evidence, primarily from in vitro and animal studies, shows that some abused drugs (e.g., opioids) may have direct effects on HIV pathology and the immune response to infection, but the clinical effects are not known. Clinical data indicate that the primary effect of drug abuse on HIV disease progression is mediated via factors that may limit access and/or adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Drug abuse is associated with reduced adherence to HAART, which is strongly correlated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes. However, the virologic and clinical effects of HAART are generally equivalent among drug abusers and non-drug abusers who adhere to therapy. These results underscore the importance of integrating medical and substance abuse interventions for HIV-positive drug abusers, to improve adherence to HAART and optimize outcomes of treatment for HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S318-S323
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume45
Issue numberSUPPL. 4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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