Optimal head rotation for internal jugular vein cannulation when relying on external landmarks

Jeremy A. Lieberman, Kayode Williams, Andrew L. Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

External anatomic landmarks have traditionally been used to approximate the location of the neck blood vessels to optimize central venous cannulation of the internal jugular vein (IJV) while avoiding the common carotid artery (CCA). Head rotation affects vessel orientation, but most landmark techniques do not specify its optimal degree. We simulated catheter insertion via both an anterior and central approach to the right IJV using an ultrasound probe held in the manner of a syringe and needle in 49 volunteers. Increased head rotation from 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° to the left of midline was associated with higher probability of a simulated needle contacting the IJV and the CCA. For both approaches, the risk of CCA contact was

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)982-988
Number of pages7
JournalAnesthesia and Analgesia
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Common Carotid Artery
Jugular Veins
Catheterization
Head
Needles
Anatomic Landmarks
Syringes
Blood Vessels
Volunteers
Neck
Catheters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Optimal head rotation for internal jugular vein cannulation when relying on external landmarks. / Lieberman, Jeremy A.; Williams, Kayode; Rosenberg, Andrew L.

In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, Vol. 99, No. 4, 10.2004, p. 982-988.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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