Optic atrophy in children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We reviewed the records of 218 children in whom a diagnosis of optic atrophy had been made between 1978 and 1987. A cause for the atrophy was determined for 195 patients (89%). Tumor, the most frequent cause, was found in 63 patients (29%). The most common tumor was a glioma of the anterior visual pathway; it was found in 27 patients (43% of tumors; 12% overall). The second most frequently encountered tumor, a craniopharyngioma, was found in 14 patients. Inflammation, the second most common cause of optic atrophy, occurred in 38 children (17%). Trauma caused optic atrophy in 24 patients (11%). No cause could be found for 23 patients (11%). Thirteen patients were less than 1 year of age at the time of diagnosis. Three of these patients had tumors. One was a cerebral glioblastoma, and the other two were optic gliomas. The diagnosis of optic atrophy in infancy does not imply a benign cause.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-193
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume106
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 15 1988

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Optic Atrophy
Neoplasms
Optic Nerve Glioma
Craniopharyngioma
Visual Pathways
Glioblastoma
Glioma
Atrophy
Inflammation
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Optic atrophy in children. / Repka, Michael X; Miller, Neil R.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 106, No. 2, 15.08.1988, p. 191-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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