Opportunistic mycelial fungal infections in organ transplant recipients: Emerging importance of non-Aspergillus mycelial fungi

Shahid Husain, Barbara D. Alexander, Patricia Munoz, Robin Avery, Sally Houston, Timothy Pruett, Richard Jacobs, Edward A. Dominguez, Jan G. Tollemar, Katherine Baumgarten, Chen M. Yu, Marilyn M. Wagener, Peter Linden, Shimon Kusne, Nina Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To determine the spectrum and impact of mycelial fungal infections, particularly those due to non-Aspergillus molds, 53 liver and heart transplant recipients with invasive mycelial infections were prospectively identified in a multicenter study. Invasive mycelial infections were due to Aspergillus species in 69.8% of patients, to non-Aspergillus hyalohyphomycetes in 9.4%, to phaeohyphomycetes in 9.4%, to zygomycetes in 5.7%, and to other causes in 5.7%. Infections due to mycelial fungi other than Aspergillus species were significantly more likely to be associated with disseminated (P = .005) and central nervous system (P = .07) infection than were those due to Aspergillus species. Overall mortality at 90 days was 54.7%. The associated mortality rate was 100% for zygomycosis, 80% for non-Aspergillus hyalohyphomycosis, 54% for aspergillosis, and 20% for phaeohyphomycosis. Thus, non-Aspergillus molds have emerged as significant pathogens in organ transplant recipients. These molds are more likely to be associated with disseminated infections and to be associated with poorer outcomes than is aspergillosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-229
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Mycoses
Fungi
Transplants
Aspergillus
Infection
Aspergillosis
Hyalohyphomycosis
Phaeohyphomycosis
Zygomycosis
Mortality
Multicenter Studies
Central Nervous System
Transplant Recipients
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Opportunistic mycelial fungal infections in organ transplant recipients : Emerging importance of non-Aspergillus mycelial fungi. / Husain, Shahid; Alexander, Barbara D.; Munoz, Patricia; Avery, Robin; Houston, Sally; Pruett, Timothy; Jacobs, Richard; Dominguez, Edward A.; Tollemar, Jan G.; Baumgarten, Katherine; Yu, Chen M.; Wagener, Marilyn M.; Linden, Peter; Kusne, Shimon; Singh, Nina.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 37, No. 2, 15.07.2003, p. 221-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Husain, S, Alexander, BD, Munoz, P, Avery, R, Houston, S, Pruett, T, Jacobs, R, Dominguez, EA, Tollemar, JG, Baumgarten, K, Yu, CM, Wagener, MM, Linden, P, Kusne, S & Singh, N 2003, 'Opportunistic mycelial fungal infections in organ transplant recipients: Emerging importance of non-Aspergillus mycelial fungi', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 221-229. https://doi.org/10.1086/375822
Husain, Shahid ; Alexander, Barbara D. ; Munoz, Patricia ; Avery, Robin ; Houston, Sally ; Pruett, Timothy ; Jacobs, Richard ; Dominguez, Edward A. ; Tollemar, Jan G. ; Baumgarten, Katherine ; Yu, Chen M. ; Wagener, Marilyn M. ; Linden, Peter ; Kusne, Shimon ; Singh, Nina. / Opportunistic mycelial fungal infections in organ transplant recipients : Emerging importance of non-Aspergillus mycelial fungi. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2003 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 221-229.
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