Opioid Receptor Polymorphism A118G Associated with Clinical Severity in a Drug Overdose Population

A. F. Manini, M. M. Jacobs, D. Vlahov, Y. L. Hurd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Genetic variations in the human mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) mediate individual differences in response to pain and opiate addiction. We studied whether the common A118G (rs1799971) mu-opioid receptor single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was associated with overdose severity in humans. In addition, we examined an SNP responsible for alternative splicing of OPRM1 (rs2075572). We assessed allele frequencies of the above SNPs and associations with clinical severity in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute drug overdose. This work was designed as an observational cohort study over a 12-month period at an urban teaching hospital. Participants consisted of consecutive adult ED patients with suspected acute drug overdose for whom discarded blood samples were available for analysis. Specimens were linked with clinical variables (demographics, urine toxicology screens, clinical outcomes) then deidentified prior to genetic SNP analysis. Blinded genotyping was performed after standard DNA purification and whole genome amplification. In-hospital severe outcomes were defined as either respiratory arrest (RA; defined by mechanical ventilation) or cardiac arrest (CA; defined by loss of pulse). We analyzed 179 patients (61% male, median age 32) who overall suffered 15 RAs and four CAs, of whom three died. The 118G allele conferred 5.3-fold increased odds of CA/RA (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-154
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Medical Toxicology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drug Overdose
Opioid Receptors
Polymorphism
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Nucleotides
mu Opioid Receptor
Opiate Alkaloids
Genes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Hospital Emergency Service
Alternative Splicing
Opioid-Related Disorders
Purification
Amplification
Urban Hospitals
Teaching
Blood
Heart Arrest
Artificial Respiration

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Opioid receptor
  • Overdose
  • Polymorphism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Opioid Receptor Polymorphism A118G Associated with Clinical Severity in a Drug Overdose Population. / Manini, A. F.; Jacobs, M. M.; Vlahov, D.; Hurd, Y. L.

In: Journal of Medical Toxicology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 148-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manini, A. F. ; Jacobs, M. M. ; Vlahov, D. ; Hurd, Y. L. / Opioid Receptor Polymorphism A118G Associated with Clinical Severity in a Drug Overdose Population. In: Journal of Medical Toxicology. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 148-154.
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