Ophthalmic disorders in adults with down syndrome

Sharon J. Krinsky-McHale, Edmund C. Jenkins, Warren B. Zigman, Wayne Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A myriad of ophthalmic disorders is associated with the phenotype of Down syndrome including strabismus, cataracts, and refractive errors potentially resulting in significant visual impairment. Ophthalmic sequelae have been extensively studied in children and adolescents with Down syndrome but less often in older adults. In-depth review of medical records of older adults with Down syndrome indicated that ophthalmic disorders were common. Cataracts were the most frequent ophthalmic disorder reported, followed by refractive errors, strabismus, and presbyopia. Severity of intellectual disability was unrelated to the presence of ophthalmic disorders. Also, ophthalmic disorders were associated with lower vision-dependent functional and cognitive abilities, although not to the extent that was expected. The high prevalence of ophthalmic disorders highlights the need for periodic evaluations and individualized treatment plans for adults with Down syndrome, in general, but especially when concerns are identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number974253
JournalCurrent Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume2012
DOIs
StatePublished - May 21 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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    Krinsky-McHale, S. J., Jenkins, E. C., Zigman, W. B., & Silverman, W. (2012). Ophthalmic disorders in adults with down syndrome. Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research, 2012, [974253]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/974253