Online tobacco marketing among US adolescent sexual, gender, racial, and ethnic minorities

Samir Soneji, Kristin E. Knutzen, Andy S.L. Tan, Meghan Moran, Jae Won Yang, James Sargent, Kelvin Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The tobacco industry has previously targeted sexual/gender and racial/ethnic minorities with focused campaigns in traditional, offline marketing. We assess whether these populations report more engagement with online tobacco marketing compared with heterosexual and non-Hispanic white youth. Methods: Data were from 8015 adolescents sampled between 2014 and 2015 in the nationally-representative Population Assessment for Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Engagement with online tobacco marketing within the past year was assessed through eight forms of engagement. A weighted logistic regression model was fit with engagement as outcome and socio-demographic and psychosocial characteristics, internet-related and substance use behavior, tobacco-related risk factors, tobacco use status, and prior engagement with online tobacco marketing as covariates. Results: Accounting for other covariates including tobacco use status and prior engagement with online tobacco marketing, the odds of past-year engagement were higher for sexual minority males (aOR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.05–2.35) compared to straight males and higher for sexual minority females (aOR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.13–1.87) compared to straight females. The odds of past-year engagement were also higher for Hispanics (aOR = 1.31; 95% CI: 1.11–1.56) and non-Hispanic Blacks (aOR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.14–1.77) compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Conclusions: Sexual/gender and and racial/ethnic minority youth reported higher engagement with online tobacco marketing than their heterosexual and non-Hispanic white peers, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-196
Number of pages8
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Tobacco
Marketing
Tobacco Use
Logistic Models
Tobacco Industry
Hispanic Americans
Internet
Population
Demography
Sexual Minorities
Health
Logistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Online tobacco marketing among US adolescent sexual, gender, racial, and ethnic minorities. / Soneji, Samir; Knutzen, Kristin E.; Tan, Andy S.L.; Moran, Meghan; Yang, Jae Won; Sargent, James; Choi, Kelvin.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 95, 01.08.2019, p. 189-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soneji, Samir ; Knutzen, Kristin E. ; Tan, Andy S.L. ; Moran, Meghan ; Yang, Jae Won ; Sargent, James ; Choi, Kelvin. / Online tobacco marketing among US adolescent sexual, gender, racial, and ethnic minorities. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2019 ; Vol. 95. pp. 189-196.
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