One hundred and forty-five consecutive pancreaticoduodenectomies without mortality

John L. Cameron, Henry A. Pitt, Charles J. Yeo, Keith D. Lillemoe, Howard S. Kaufman, Jo Ann Coleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: A review of mortality and morbidity for pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed for 145 consecutive patients who underwent the operative procedure between 1988 and 1991. Summary Background Data: In the past, pancreaticoduodenectomy has carried a high hospital morbidity and mortality. During the 1970s, many considered that the operation should be abandoned. Recent data, however, suggest that a marked drop in both morbidity and mortality have occurred for this operative procedure. Methods: Among the 145 consecutive patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy, 108 patients were 69 years of age or younger, and 37 were 70 years of age or older. Four patients were 80 years of age or older. One hundred and seven patients had a malignant neoplasm, whereas 38 patients had benign disease. There were no significant differences in preoperative risk factors when the younger and older, and benign disease and malignant disease groups were compared. Results: Mean operative time was 7.3 hours. Median blood loss was O, indicating that more than one-half of the patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomies without blood transfusions. There were no significant differences in postoperative complications when the younger and older, and benign disease and malignant disease groups were compared. There was no hospital or 30-day mortality. Conclusions: With appropriate preoperative selection, virtually any patient in any age group, with benign or malignant disease, can undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy with minimal risk of hospital mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)430-438
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume217
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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