Olecranon and prepatellar bursitis: Treating acute, chronic, and inflamed

Edward G McFarland, P. Mamanee, W. S. Queale, Andrew J Cosgarea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Elbow and knee bursitis is common in both athletes and nonathletes and has three basic presentations: acute, chronic nonseptic, and chronic infected. Most acute swellings occur after trauma and can be treated with early aspiration, compression, and padding. Chronic, nonseptic bursitis can usually be treated with conservative therapy and, occasionally, aspiration or corticosteroid injection. Inflamed bursae should be aggressively evaluated and treated. Some may require aspiration and decompression, and oral or intravenous antibiotics should be started to prevent septicemia. Incision and drainage is rarely needed but may be indicated for injuries that do not respond. Surgical excision of the bursa is recommended only for recalcitrant cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-52
Number of pages13
JournalPhysician and Sportsmedicine
Volume28
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Olecranon Process
Bursitis
Wounds and Injuries
Elbow
Decompression
Athletes
Drainage
Knee
Sepsis
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Injections
Conservative Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Olecranon and prepatellar bursitis : Treating acute, chronic, and inflamed. / McFarland, Edward G; Mamanee, P.; Queale, W. S.; Cosgarea, Andrew J.

In: Physician and Sportsmedicine, Vol. 28, No. 3, 2000, p. 40-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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