Office evaluation and treatment of finger and hand injuries in children

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Injury is our children's greatest health problem, and pediatricians will frequently see finger and hand injuries in the office and emergency room. Many of these will be fingertip crush injuries, which are quite common in toddlers and are often undertreated. Pediatric finger and wrist fractures and sprains generally do well but require proper diagnosis and treatment. Innocent-looking wounds from glass lacerations may disguise extensive damage to underlying nerves, arteries, and tendons. Advances in microsurgery allow replantation of distal amputations even in young children and infants, although often not without complications. Thermal injuries and animal bites require early and aggressive treatment. As with many pediatric hand injuries these injuries should be preventable, and the adverse consequences can be minimized with appropriate diagnosis and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-87
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume7
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Finger Injuries
Hand Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Pediatrics
Microsurgery
Replantation
Lacerations
Bites and Stings
Therapeutics
Wrist
Amputation
Tendons
Fingers
Glass
Hospital Emergency Service
Arteries
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Office evaluation and treatment of finger and hand injuries in children. / Innis, Peter.

In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1995, p. 83-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{0b1d5d75bdac4803a25ce84ded28ace1,
title = "Office evaluation and treatment of finger and hand injuries in children",
abstract = "Injury is our children's greatest health problem, and pediatricians will frequently see finger and hand injuries in the office and emergency room. Many of these will be fingertip crush injuries, which are quite common in toddlers and are often undertreated. Pediatric finger and wrist fractures and sprains generally do well but require proper diagnosis and treatment. Innocent-looking wounds from glass lacerations may disguise extensive damage to underlying nerves, arteries, and tendons. Advances in microsurgery allow replantation of distal amputations even in young children and infants, although often not without complications. Thermal injuries and animal bites require early and aggressive treatment. As with many pediatric hand injuries these injuries should be preventable, and the adverse consequences can be minimized with appropriate diagnosis and management.",
author = "Peter Innis",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "83--87",
journal = "Current Opinion in Pediatrics",
issn = "1040-8703",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Office evaluation and treatment of finger and hand injuries in children

AU - Innis, Peter

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Injury is our children's greatest health problem, and pediatricians will frequently see finger and hand injuries in the office and emergency room. Many of these will be fingertip crush injuries, which are quite common in toddlers and are often undertreated. Pediatric finger and wrist fractures and sprains generally do well but require proper diagnosis and treatment. Innocent-looking wounds from glass lacerations may disguise extensive damage to underlying nerves, arteries, and tendons. Advances in microsurgery allow replantation of distal amputations even in young children and infants, although often not without complications. Thermal injuries and animal bites require early and aggressive treatment. As with many pediatric hand injuries these injuries should be preventable, and the adverse consequences can be minimized with appropriate diagnosis and management.

AB - Injury is our children's greatest health problem, and pediatricians will frequently see finger and hand injuries in the office and emergency room. Many of these will be fingertip crush injuries, which are quite common in toddlers and are often undertreated. Pediatric finger and wrist fractures and sprains generally do well but require proper diagnosis and treatment. Innocent-looking wounds from glass lacerations may disguise extensive damage to underlying nerves, arteries, and tendons. Advances in microsurgery allow replantation of distal amputations even in young children and infants, although often not without complications. Thermal injuries and animal bites require early and aggressive treatment. As with many pediatric hand injuries these injuries should be preventable, and the adverse consequences can be minimized with appropriate diagnosis and management.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028917011&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028917011&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 7728210

AN - SCOPUS:0028917011

VL - 7

SP - 83

EP - 87

JO - Current Opinion in Pediatrics

JF - Current Opinion in Pediatrics

SN - 1040-8703

IS - 1

ER -