Off-premise alcohol outlets and substance use in young and emerging adults

Adam J. Milam, C. Debra M. Furr-Holden, Paul Harrell, Nicholas Ialongo, Philip J. Leaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This investigation examined the association between alcohol outlets and substance use during young adulthood in Baltimore, MD. Geospatial methods were used to determine the number of outlets within walking distance of the participant's home and distance to nearest outlet. Logistic regression models found that distance to the nearest alcohol outlet was associated with past year marijuana use after adjusting for community disadvantage and sociodemographic characteristics (OR = 0.77, p = .03); specifically, as distance to the nearest outlet increased the likelihood of marijuana use decreased. Findings suggest that distance to the nearest alcohol outlet was a better predictor of marijuana use than the density of alcohol outlets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-29
Number of pages8
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume49
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Alcohol
  • Drugs; young adults
  • Marijuana

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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