Oculomotor performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder

Allen Y. Tien, Godfrey D. Pearlson, Steven R. Machlin, Frederick W. Bylsma, Rudolf Hoehn-Saric

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Neuroimaging studies have shown abnormalities of the frontal cortex and basal ganglia in persons with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Since lesions in the frontal cortex and basal ganglia areas affect performance on goal-guided saccadic eye movements, this study investigated the relation between the diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder and oculomotor performance. Method: Eleven patients with the clinical diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder and 14 normal subjects were assessed with respect to their performance on both visual-guided and goal-guided oculomotor tasks. Fixation performance was also measured. Results: The group with obsessive-compulsive disorder had a very significantly greater error rate and a significantly greater rate of inaccurate saccades on the goal-guided antisaccade task, whereas they were not different from the normal group in reaction time, saccadic velocity, and accuracy on the visual-guided saccade task. The distribution of error rates for the patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder was broad, with more than one-half outside the range of the normal group. Most of the abnormal findings were among male patients. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis of a relationship between impaired performance on goal-guided saccadic eye movement tasks and the diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder, but they also suggest a gender-related subgroup within the group with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)641-646
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume149
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Saccades
Frontal Lobe
Basal Ganglia
Neuroimaging
Reaction Time
Reference Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Tien, A. Y., Pearlson, G. D., Machlin, S. R., Bylsma, F. W., & Hoehn-Saric, R. (1992). Oculomotor performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 149(5), 641-646.

Oculomotor performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder. / Tien, Allen Y.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Machlin, Steven R.; Bylsma, Frederick W.; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 149, No. 5, 1992, p. 641-646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tien, AY, Pearlson, GD, Machlin, SR, Bylsma, FW & Hoehn-Saric, R 1992, 'Oculomotor performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 149, no. 5, pp. 641-646.
Tien AY, Pearlson GD, Machlin SR, Bylsma FW, Hoehn-Saric R. Oculomotor performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1992;149(5):641-646.
Tien, Allen Y. ; Pearlson, Godfrey D. ; Machlin, Steven R. ; Bylsma, Frederick W. ; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf. / Oculomotor performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 1992 ; Vol. 149, No. 5. pp. 641-646.
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