Ocular surface squamous neoplasia

A survey of changes in the standard of care from 2003 to 2012

Eldad Adler, Joseph R. Turner, Donald U. Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE:: To evaluate the current standard of care of ophthalmologists who are likely to encounter ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) in their practices and to compare this with data gathered in 2003. METHODS:: Invitations to a web-based survey were sent to members of the Ocular Microbiology and Immunology Group. In addition, the survey was posted to the Cornea Society Listserv, Keranet. The survey contained questions regarding the surgical and medical management of OSSN and postcare follow-up. The results of this survey were compared with the results of a 2003 survey, where possible, to identify the areas of change in the standard of care. RESULTS:: Eighty-one ophthalmologists participated in the survey. Seventy-nine percent of the responders thought that there was enough evidence for topical monotherapy in OSSN, but only 58% reported ever using topical agents as monotherapy. First-line topical therapy was interferon α2b (56%) followed by mitomycin C (MMC) (37%). A shift from surgical excision alone to excision followed by topical therapy was seen when comparing the 2012 survey to the 2003 survey. The preferred postexcision topical agent was MMC. Seventy-five percent of responders evaluate their patients every 2 to 4 months during the first 2 years. CONCLUSIONS:: Topical agents were being used more in 2012, either in combination with surgical excision or as monotherapy, compared with those used in 2003. Interferon has replaced MMC as the agent most used for topical monotherapy, possibly because of a favorable safety and tolerance profile. Prospective randomized trials are needed to better define the ideal practice patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1558-1561
Number of pages4
JournalCornea
Volume32
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Standard of Care
Neoplasms
Mitomycin
Interferons
Surveys and Questionnaires
Microbiology
Allergy and Immunology
Cornea
Safety
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • corneal intraepithelial neoplasia
  • interferon
  • mitomycin C
  • ocular surface squamous neoplasia
  • standard of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Ocular surface squamous neoplasia : A survey of changes in the standard of care from 2003 to 2012. / Adler, Eldad; Turner, Joseph R.; Stone, Donald U.

In: Cornea, Vol. 32, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 1558-1561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adler, Eldad ; Turner, Joseph R. ; Stone, Donald U. / Ocular surface squamous neoplasia : A survey of changes in the standard of care from 2003 to 2012. In: Cornea. 2013 ; Vol. 32, No. 12. pp. 1558-1561.
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