Ocular jellyfish stings

David B Glasser, M. J. Noell, J. W. Burnett, S. S. Kathuria, M. M. Rodrigues

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Corneal stings from the sea nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha) indigenous to the Chesapeake Bay are usually painful but self-limited injuries, with resolution in 24 to 48 hours. Methods: Five patients who developed unusually severe and prolonged iritis and intraocular pressure elevation after receiving corneal sea nettle stings were followed for 2 to 4 years. Results: Decreased visual acuity, iritis, and increased intraocular pressure (32 to 48 mmHg) were noted in all cases. Iritis responded to topical corticosteroids and resolved within 8 weeks. Elevated intraocular pressure responded to topical beta blockers and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Mydriasis (4 of 5 cases), decreased accommodation (2 of 5 cases), peripheral anterior synechiae (2 of 5 cases), and iris transillumination defects (3 of 5 cases) also were noted. Mydriasis and decreased accommodation persisted for 5 months in 1 case and for more than 2 years in another. One patient has chronic unilateral glaucoma. Visual acuity returned to normal in all cases. Conclusions: The precise relationship between sea nettle venom and the observed clinical responses is not known. Corneal jellyfish stings usually produce a brief and self-limited reaction, but they do have the potential for long-term sequelae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1414-1418
Number of pages5
JournalOphthalmology
Volume99
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Iritis
Bites and Stings
Intraocular Pressure
Oceans and Seas
Mydriasis
East Coast Sea Nettle
Visual Acuity
Transillumination
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors
Venoms
Iris
Glaucoma
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Glasser, D. B., Noell, M. J., Burnett, J. W., Kathuria, S. S., & Rodrigues, M. M. (1992). Ocular jellyfish stings. Ophthalmology, 99(9), 1414-1418.

Ocular jellyfish stings. / Glasser, David B; Noell, M. J.; Burnett, J. W.; Kathuria, S. S.; Rodrigues, M. M.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 99, No. 9, 1992, p. 1414-1418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glasser, DB, Noell, MJ, Burnett, JW, Kathuria, SS & Rodrigues, MM 1992, 'Ocular jellyfish stings', Ophthalmology, vol. 99, no. 9, pp. 1414-1418.
Glasser DB, Noell MJ, Burnett JW, Kathuria SS, Rodrigues MM. Ocular jellyfish stings. Ophthalmology. 1992;99(9):1414-1418.
Glasser, David B ; Noell, M. J. ; Burnett, J. W. ; Kathuria, S. S. ; Rodrigues, M. M. / Ocular jellyfish stings. In: Ophthalmology. 1992 ; Vol. 99, No. 9. pp. 1414-1418.
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