Ocular diseases and nonbattle injuries seen at a Tertiary Care Medical Center during the global war on terrorism

Maximilian Psolka, Kraig S. Bower, Dain B. Brooks, Steven J. Donnelly, Melissa Iglesias, William R. Rimm, Thomas P. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We retrospectively reviewed the records of 107 U.S. military personnel referred to the Walter Reed Army Medical Center ophthalmology service with eye diseases and nonbattle injuries diagnosed during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Ocular diseases and nonbattle injuries ranged from minor to vision-threatening, represented a broad variety of conditions, and required the expertise of a number of ophthalmic subspecialists. The most common diagnoses were uveitis (13.1%), retinal detachment (11.2%), infectious keratitis (4.7%), and choroidal neovascularization (4.7%). Eighty-four patients (78.5%) met Army retention standards and were returned to duty. Twenty patients (18.7%) were referred to a medical evaluation board, seven (6.5%) of whom failed to meet retention standards for eye and vision; the retention status of three patients (2.8%) remains to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-497
Number of pages7
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume172
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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