Occurrence and distribution of serotypes of the Arizona subgroup of Salmonella strains in the United States from 1967 to 1976

S. H. Weiss, M. J. Blaser, F. P. Paleologo, R. E. Black, A. C. McWhorter, M. A. Asbury, G. P. Carter, R. A. Feldman, D. J. Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Salmonella Arizona subgroup contains gram-negative enteric bacteria that are closely related to other salmonellae biochemically, serologically, and genetically. Although the Arizona subgroup may be isolated from a wide variety of nonhuman and human sources, the arizonae are uncommonly recognized as human pathogens, and surprisingly little is known about their epidemiology. From 1967 through 1976, the Centers for Disease Control received 858 Arizona subgroup cultures from human and nonhuman sources representing 143 different serotypes in 33 somatic groups; several serotypes had not been previously reported. The 374 cultures from humans represent 71 different serotypes; extraintestinal isolates were present in 31 (44%) serotypes. Compared with data from a previous 20 years of surveillance, the proportion of Arizona subgroup strains isolated from stools, blood, and other sites was remarkably stable, but several serotypes showed marked changes in their frequency of isolation. In total, the ratio of extraintestinal to intestinal isolates was 0.37, but marked serotype-specific variation was noted, suggesting differences in virulence associated with serotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1056-1064
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

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