Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxemia are associated with advanced liver histology in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Shikha S. Sundaram, Ronald J. Sokol, Kelley E. Capocelli, Zhaoxing Pan, Jillian S. Sullivan, Kristen Robbins, Ann C. Halbower

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective To determine whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and/or nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with the severity of liver injury in patients with pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Study design Obese children aged 10-18 years with liver biopsy-proven NAFLD were enrolled. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected, polysomnography was performed, and liver histology was scored. Subjects were divided into those with OSA/hypoxemia and those without OSA/hypoxemia for analysis. Results Of 25 subjects with NAFLD, OSA/hypoxemia was present in 15 (60%) (mean age, 12.8 ± 1.9 years; 68% male; 88% Hispanic; mean body mass index z-score, 2.3 ± 0.3). Subjects with and without OSA/hypoxemia had similar levels of serum aminotransferases, serum lipids, and inflammatory and insulin resistance markers. Although there were no differences between groups in the histological severity of steatosis, inflammation, ballooning degeneration, NAFLD activity score, or histological grade, subjects with OSA/hypoxemia had significantly more severe hepatic fibrosis. Moreover, oxygen saturation nadir during polysomnography was related to hepatic fibrosis stage (r = -0.49; P =.01) and aspartate aminotransferase level (r = 0.42; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume164
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxemia are associated with advanced liver histology in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this