Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study: Impact of Changes From DSM-IV to DSM-5

Alexandra S. Potter, Max M. Owens, Matthew Albaugh, Hugh Garavan, Kenneth J. Sher, Joan Kaufman, Deanna M. Barch

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Abstract

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), used to diagnose psychiatric disorders, was revised to DSM-5 in 2013. Changes were made to the criteria for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 1% to 3% in children.1 Prior revisions to OCD criteria (from DSM-III to DSM-IV) resulted in lower reported prevalence rates,2 but this is not yet clear with DSM-5. In DSM-5, the definition of obsessions was broadened (Table 1), and the requirement that obsessions cause marked anxiety or distress was removed. Thus we examined rates of OCD within the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study3 using both DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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