Observed handwashing with soap practices among cholera patients and accompanying household members in a hospital setting (CHoBI7 trial)

Fatema Zohura, Sazzadul Islam Bhuyian, Shirajum Monira, Farzana Begum, Shwapon K. Biswas, Tahmina Parvin, David Allen Sack, R. Bradley Sack, Elli Leontsini, K. M. Saif-Ur-Rahman, Mahamud Ur Rashid, Rumana Sharmin, Xiaotong Zhang, Munirul Alam, Christine Marie George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Household members of cholera patients are at a 100 times higher risk of cholera than the general population. Despite this risk, there are only a handful of studies that have investigated the handwashing practices among hospitalized diarrhea patients and their accompanying household members. To investigate handwashing practices in a hospital setting among this high-risk population, 444 hours of structured observation was conducted in a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh, among 148 cholera patients and their household members. Handwashing with soap practices were observed at the following key events: after toileting, after cleaning the anus of a child, after removing child feces, during food preparation, before eating, and before feeding. Spot-checks were also conducted to observe the presence of soap at bathroom areas. Overall, 4% (4/103) of key events involved handwashing with soap among cholera patients and household members during the structured observation period. This was 3% (1/37) among cholera patients and 5% (3/66) for household members. For toileting events, observed handwashing with soap was 7% (3/46) overall, 7% (1/14) for cholera patients, and 6% (2/32) for household members. For food-related events, overall observed handwashing with soap was 2% (2/93 overall), and 0% (0/34) and 3% (2/59) for cholera patients and household members, respectively. Soap was observed at only 7% (4/55) of handwashing stations used by patients and household members during spot-checks. Observed handwashing with soap at key times among patients and accompanying household members was very low. These findings highlight the urgent need for interventions to target this high-risk population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1314-1318
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Hand Disinfection
Soaps
Cholera
Toilet Facilities
Observation
Population
Food
Bangladesh
Anal Canal
Feces
Diarrhea
Eating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Observed handwashing with soap practices among cholera patients and accompanying household members in a hospital setting (CHoBI7 trial). / Zohura, Fatema; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Monira, Shirajum; Begum, Farzana; Biswas, Shwapon K.; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, David Allen; Sack, R. Bradley; Leontsini, Elli; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K. M.; Rashid, Mahamud Ur; Sharmin, Rumana; Zhang, Xiaotong; Alam, Munirul; George, Christine Marie.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 95, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 1314-1318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zohura, F, Bhuyian, SI, Monira, S, Begum, F, Biswas, SK, Parvin, T, Sack, DA, Sack, RB, Leontsini, E, Saif-Ur-Rahman, KM, Rashid, MU, Sharmin, R, Zhang, X, Alam, M & George, CM 2016, 'Observed handwashing with soap practices among cholera patients and accompanying household members in a hospital setting (CHoBI7 trial)', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 95, no. 6, pp. 1314-1318. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0379
Zohura, Fatema ; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam ; Monira, Shirajum ; Begum, Farzana ; Biswas, Shwapon K. ; Parvin, Tahmina ; Sack, David Allen ; Sack, R. Bradley ; Leontsini, Elli ; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K. M. ; Rashid, Mahamud Ur ; Sharmin, Rumana ; Zhang, Xiaotong ; Alam, Munirul ; George, Christine Marie. / Observed handwashing with soap practices among cholera patients and accompanying household members in a hospital setting (CHoBI7 trial). In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2016 ; Vol. 95, No. 6. pp. 1314-1318.
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AU - Begum, Farzana

AU - Biswas, Shwapon K.

AU - Parvin, Tahmina

AU - Sack, David Allen

AU - Sack, R. Bradley

AU - Leontsini, Elli

AU - Saif-Ur-Rahman, K. M.

AU - Rashid, Mahamud Ur

AU - Sharmin, Rumana

AU - Zhang, Xiaotong

AU - Alam, Munirul

AU - George, Christine Marie

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