Obesity-Related Dietary Behaviors among Racially and Ethnically Diverse Pregnant and Postpartum Women

Ashley Harris, Nymisha Chilukuri, Meredith West, Janice Henderson, Shari Lawson, Sarah Polk, David Levine, Wendy L. Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction. Obesity is common among reproductive age women and disproportionately impacts racial/ethnic minorities. Our objective was to assess racial/ethnic differences in obesity-related dietary behaviors among pregnant and postpartum women, to inform peripartum weight management interventions that target diverse populations. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 212 Black (44%), Hispanic (31%), and White (25%) women, aged ≥ 18, pregnant or within one year postpartum, in hospital-based clinics in Baltimore, Maryland, in 2013. Outcomes were fast food or sugar-sweetened beverage intake once or more weekly. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association between race/ethnicity and obesity-related dietary behaviors, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Results. In adjusted analyses, Black women had 2.4 increased odds of fast food intake once or more weekly compared to White women (CI = 1.08, 5.23). There were no racial/ethnic differences in the odds of sugar-sweetened beverage intake. Discussion. Compared with White or Hispanic women, Black women had 2-fold higher odds of fast food intake once or more weekly. Black women might benefit from targeted counseling and intervention to reduce fast food intake during and after pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9832167
JournalJournal of Pregnancy
Volume2016
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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