O-GlcNAc and the control of gene expression

Frank I. Comer, Gerald Warren Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many eukaryotic proteins contain O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on their serine and threonine side chain hydroxyls. In contrast to classical cell surface glycosylation, O-GlcNAc occurs on resident nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. O-GlcNAc exists as a single monosaccharide residue, showing no evidence of further elongation. Like phosphorylation, O-GlcNAc is highly dynamic, transiently modifying proteins. These post-translational modifications give rise to functionally distinct subsets of a given protein. Furthermore, all known O-GlcNAc proteins are also phosphoproteins that reversibly form multimeric complexes that are sensitive to the state of phosphorylation. This observation implies that O-GlcNAc may work in concert with phosphorylation to mediate regulated protein interactions. The proteins that bear the O-GlcNAc modification are very diverse, including RNA polymerase II and many of its transcription factors, numerous chromatin- associated proteins, nuclear pore proteins, proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressors and proteins involved in translation. Here, we discuss the functional implications of O-GlcNAc-modifications of proteins involved in various aspects of gene expression, beginning with proteins involved in transcription and ending with proteins involved in regulating protein translation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-171
Number of pages11
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects
Volume1473
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 17 1999

Fingerprint

Gene expression
Gene Expression
Proteins
Phosphorylation
Nuclear Proteins
Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Nuclear Pore
Porins
Glycosylation
Acetylglucosamine
Proto-Oncogenes
Monosaccharides
RNA Polymerase II
Phosphoproteins
Protein Biosynthesis
Threonine
Post Translational Protein Processing
Transcription
Hydroxyl Radical
Serine

Keywords

  • N-Acetylglucosamine
  • O-Linked N-acetylglucosamine
  • Protein glycosylation
  • Transcription

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

O-GlcNAc and the control of gene expression. / Comer, Frank I.; Hart, Gerald Warren.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects, Vol. 1473, No. 1, 17.12.1999, p. 161-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Comer, Frank I. ; Hart, Gerald Warren. / O-GlcNAc and the control of gene expression. In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects. 1999 ; Vol. 1473, No. 1. pp. 161-171.
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