Nutritional Status is Associated with Faster Cognitive Decline and Worse Functional Impairment in the Progression of Dementia: The Cache County Dementia Progression Study

Chelsea Sanders, Stephanie Behrens, Sarah Schwartz, Heidi Wengreen, Chris D. Corcoran, Constantine G. Lyketsos, Joann T. Tschanz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Nutritional status may be a modifiable factor in the progression of dementia. We examined the association of nutritional status and rate of cognitive and functional decline in a U.S. population-based sample. Study design was an observational longitudinal study with annual follow-ups up to 6 years of 292 persons with dementia (72 Alzheimer's disease, 56 female) in Cache County, UT using the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes (CDR-sb), and modified Mini Nutritional Assessment (mMNA). mMNA scores declined by approximately 0.50 points/year, suggesting increasing risk for malnutrition. Lower mMNA score predicted faster rate of decline on the MMSE at earlier follow-up times, but slower decline at later follow-up times, whereas higher mMNA scores had the opposite pattern (mMNA by time β= 0.22, p = 0.017; mMNA by time2 β= -0.04, p = 0.04). Lower mMNA score was associated with greater impairment on the CDR-sb over the course of dementia (β= 0.35, p < 0.001). Assessment of malnutrition may be useful in predicting rates of progression in dementia and may provide a target for clinical intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-42
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 26 2016

Keywords

  • Cognitive symptoms
  • dementia
  • disease progression
  • malnutrition
  • nutrition assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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