Nursing professional attire: Probing patient preferences to inform implementation

Joanne T. Clavelle, Michal Goodwin, Laura J. Tivis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to increase understanding of patient perceptions of nursing professional image, appearance, and identification to inform implementation of professional clinical attire. BACKGROUND:: There is growing evidence of patient preference for and organizational implementation of professional clinical attire. METHODS:: A total of 350 randomly selected inpatients were surveyed using the professional image and patient preferences survey prior to a revision of the dress code for nursing. RESULTS:: Patients gave high scores for nursing image, appearance, and identification, with no support for color-coded uniforms. CONCLUSIONS:: Organizations should assess patient perceptions before implementation of a dress code for nursing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-177
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nursing Administration
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Preference
Nursing
Inpatients
Color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

Nursing professional attire : Probing patient preferences to inform implementation. / Clavelle, Joanne T.; Goodwin, Michal; Tivis, Laura J.

In: Journal of Nursing Administration, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.03.2013, p. 172-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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