Nurses' personal opinions about patients' pain and their effect on recorded assessments and titration of opioid doses

Margo McCaffery, Betty Ferrell, Chris Pasero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In many clinical settings, nurses have a vital role in pain assessment and titration of opioid doses. Surveys of nurses have revealed knowledge deficits in these areas that are thought to contribute to undertreatment of pain. The present study surveys nurses' decisions about assessment and treatment of pain in 2 patient situations and confirms that nurses continue to undertreat severe pain. As shown in previous studies, nurses may be more influenced by the patient's behavior than the patient's self-report of pain, especially in relation to decisions about opioid titration. Nurses are less likely to increase a previously safe but ineffective dose of opioid for a smiling patient than a grimacing patient. Survey results reveal a tendency for nurses' personal opinions about the patients' pain, rather than their recorded assessments, to influence choice of opioid dose and to contribute to undertreatment of pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-87
Number of pages9
JournalPain Management Nursing
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Opioid Analgesics
Nurses
Pain
Pain Measurement
Smiling
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Nurses' personal opinions about patients' pain and their effect on recorded assessments and titration of opioid doses. / McCaffery, Margo; Ferrell, Betty; Pasero, Chris.

In: Pain Management Nursing, Vol. 1, No. 3, 01.01.2000, p. 79-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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