Nurses' Health Education Program in India Increases HIV Knowledge and Reduces Fear

Hemlata Pisal, Savita Sutar, Jayagowri Sastry, Nandita Kapadia-Kundu, Aparna Joshi, Mangala Joshi, Jo Leslie, Lisa Scotti, Kapila Bharucha, Nishi Suryavanshi, Mrudula Phadke, Robert C Bollinger, Anita V Shankar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Few health care facilities are adequately prepared to manage and care for HIV/AIDS patients in India. Nurses play a critical role in patient care but are often ill-equipped to deal with their own fears of occupational risk and handle the clinical aspects of HIV/AIDS care, leading to stigma and discrimination toward HIV-positive patients. The authors examine the impact of a 4-day HIV/AIDS health education program on knowledge and attitudes of nurses in a government hospital. This education program was developed using a training of trainers model and qualitative research. A total of 21 master trainers underwent 6 days of training and began training of 552 hospital nurses (in 2004-2005). Using a pretest-posttest design, the authors assessed changes in knowledge and attitudes of 371 trained nurses. Significant improvements were seen in nurses' HIV/AIDS knowledge in all areas including care, treatment, and issues of confidentiality and consent. Fear of interaction with people living with HIV/AIDS was reduced significantly. The short course was successful in increasing nurses' knowledge in all aspects. There is great potential to expand this stigma-reduction intervention to other public and private hospitals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-43
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Education
Fear
India
Nurses
HIV
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Private Hospitals
Qualitative Research
Public Hospitals
Confidentiality
Health Facilities
Patient Care
Delivery of Health Care
Education

Keywords

  • discrimination
  • fear reduction
  • health education
  • health service delivery
  • HIV/AIDS
  • nurses
  • stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Nurses' Health Education Program in India Increases HIV Knowledge and Reduces Fear. / Pisal, Hemlata; Sutar, Savita; Sastry, Jayagowri; Kapadia-Kundu, Nandita; Joshi, Aparna; Joshi, Mangala; Leslie, Jo; Scotti, Lisa; Bharucha, Kapila; Suryavanshi, Nishi; Phadke, Mrudula; Bollinger, Robert C; Shankar, Anita V.

In: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, Vol. 18, No. 6, 11.2007, p. 32-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pisal, H, Sutar, S, Sastry, J, Kapadia-Kundu, N, Joshi, A, Joshi, M, Leslie, J, Scotti, L, Bharucha, K, Suryavanshi, N, Phadke, M, Bollinger, RC & Shankar, AV 2007, 'Nurses' Health Education Program in India Increases HIV Knowledge and Reduces Fear', Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 32-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jana.2007.06.002
Pisal, Hemlata ; Sutar, Savita ; Sastry, Jayagowri ; Kapadia-Kundu, Nandita ; Joshi, Aparna ; Joshi, Mangala ; Leslie, Jo ; Scotti, Lisa ; Bharucha, Kapila ; Suryavanshi, Nishi ; Phadke, Mrudula ; Bollinger, Robert C ; Shankar, Anita V. / Nurses' Health Education Program in India Increases HIV Knowledge and Reduces Fear. In: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. 2007 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 32-43.
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