Nurses' Competence Caring for Hospitalized Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices

Jesus Casida, Martha Abshire, Brian Widmar, Pamela Combs, Regi Freeman, Linda Baas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Nursing care is an essential component of the delivery of high-quality patient care for advanced heart failure patients with ventricular assist devices (VADs). However, there is little information about how VAD patient care competence is formed, and there are no empirical data regarding the bed nurses' competence. Objectives The aim of this study was to explain how nurses perceived their competence related to VAD technology and how they utilized resources to equip themselves for the management of patients with implantable VADs. Methods An exploratory correlational research design was used in this study. Online surveys including demographic and work characteristics questionnaires as well as VAD Innovation in Nursing Appraisal Scale (knowledge, adoption, and communication) were completed by 237 critical-care unit and progressive care unit (PCU) nurses. Results Ventricular assist device knowledge, adoption, and communication of innovation mean scores were 3.9 ± 0.6, 3.9 ± 0.8, and 3.7 ± 0.9, respectively, indicating moderate/high levels. Critical-care unit nurses reported higher levels of knowledge (3.7 vs 3.6) and adoption (4.0 vs 3.8; P <.05) of innovation than did the PCU nurses, with no differences in communication. Compared with PCU nurses, critical-care unit nurses were more likely to seek VAD competence-related information using mass media. Innovation and adoption were associated with years of nursing experience and some hospital characteristics. Conclusion Critical-care unit nurses have higher self-reported VAD care competence than PCU nurses. Further research is needed to confirm the findings and link nurse competence with VAD patient outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-49
Number of pages12
JournalDimensions of Critical Care Nursing
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Heart-Assist Devices
Mental Competency
Nurses
Critical Care
Communication
Patient Care
Nursing
Mass Media
Quality of Health Care
Nursing Care
Research Design
Heart Failure
Demography
Technology

Keywords

  • Acute and critical-care nursing
  • Mechanical circulatory support
  • VAD nursing competence/competency
  • VAD nursing education/training
  • Ventricular assist device

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency
  • Critical Care

Cite this

Nurses' Competence Caring for Hospitalized Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices. / Casida, Jesus; Abshire, Martha; Widmar, Brian; Combs, Pamela; Freeman, Regi; Baas, Linda.

In: Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 38-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Casida, Jesus ; Abshire, Martha ; Widmar, Brian ; Combs, Pamela ; Freeman, Regi ; Baas, Linda. / Nurses' Competence Caring for Hospitalized Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices. In: Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing. 2019 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 38-49.
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