Nurse practitioner and physician assistant practices in three HMOs: Implications for future US health manpower needs

J. P. Weiner, D. M. Steinwachs, J. W. Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study empirically examines the practices of non-physician providers (NPPs) within three large competitive health maintenance organizations (HMOs), as well as the physicians' and NPPs' views regarding the ideal role of NPPs. These roles are compared with NPP delegation patterns incorporated in the modeling methodology developed by the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee (GMENAC). GMENAC recommended relatively high levels of delegation by physicians to NPPs. One of the HMO sites made use of NPPs at rates even higher than GMENAC's national ideals, while the rates of the other two were lower. The normative ideals for pediatric NPPs developed at each HMO were consistently higher than their actual roles. Concerns with acceptance and the role of NPPs are clearly no longer issues. Instead, the limits on NPP involvement appear to relate to considerations of costs, availability, and the increasing numbers of physicians competing for similar opportunities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)507-511
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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