Nurse-Led Delivery of Brief Interventions for At-Risk Alcohol Use: An Integrative Review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Nurses are in key positions to reduce the global burden associated with alcohol, yet many are ill-prepared to screen for alcohol use and intervene accordingly. The purpose of this integrative review was to identify best practices for educating nurses to work with patients who are at risk for alcohol-related adverse consequences, implement alcohol screening, and deliver alcohol brief interventions (ABIs). AIM: To identify and synthesize findings from randomized control trials of ABIs delivered by nurses to patients identified through screening to be at risk because of alcohol use. METHOD: The results of 11 published randomized control trials identified from a multi-database search were synthesized. RESULTS: The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test was used for alcohol screening in more than half of the studies. Most of the ABIs were based on motivational interviewing and delivered in 30 minutes or less. While there was limited information on the characteristics of nurses who delivered the interventions and how nurses were prepared to deliver the ABIs, the exemplar was a full day workshop teaching nurses on an evidence-based framework for the ABI. All studies measured alcohol consumption as an outcome, yet few used rigorous methods for obtaining this self-reported data. CONCLUSIONS: A 1-day workshop is recommended as an educational modality to prepare nurses to implement the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test for identification of persons who are at risk because of alcohol use, deliver a structured brief intervention in less than 30 minutes, and utilize a standard measure of alcohol consumption for evaluation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • alcohol
  • brief intervention
  • nurses
  • randomized control trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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