Nurse case management of hypercholesterolemia in patients with coronary heart disease

Results of a randomized clinical trial

Jerilyn K. Allen, Roger S Blumenthal, Simeon Margolis, Deborah Rohm Young, Edgar R Miller, Kathleen Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Despite the large body of evidence confirming the effectiveness of lipid lowering for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) events, undertreatment of hyperlipidemia is common. This study tested the effectiveness of a nurse case management program to lower blood lipids in patients with CHD. Methods: A total of 228 consecutive, eligible adults with hypercholesterolemia and CHD were recruited during hospitalization after coronary revascularization. Patients were randomized to receive lipid management, including individualized lifestyle modification and pharmacologic intervention, from a nurse practitioner for 1 year after discharge in addition to their usual care (NURS), or to usual care enhanced with feedback on lipids to their primary provider and/or cardiologist (EUC). Results: Significantly more patients in the NURS group than in the EUC group achieved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)levels

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)678-686
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume144
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

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Case Management
Hypercholesterolemia
Coronary Disease
Randomized Controlled Trials
Nurses
Lipids
Nurse Practitioners
Secondary Prevention
Hyperlipidemias
LDL Cholesterol
Life Style
Hospitalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Despite the large body of evidence confirming the effectiveness of lipid lowering for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) events, undertreatment of hyperlipidemia is common. This study tested the effectiveness of a nurse case management program to lower blood lipids in patients with CHD. Methods: A total of 228 consecutive, eligible adults with hypercholesterolemia and CHD were recruited during hospitalization after coronary revascularization. Patients were randomized to receive lipid management, including individualized lifestyle modification and pharmacologic intervention, from a nurse practitioner for 1 year after discharge in addition to their usual care (NURS), or to usual care enhanced with feedback on lipids to their primary provider and/or cardiologist (EUC). Results: Significantly more patients in the NURS group than in the EUC group achieved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)levels",
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AU - Young, Deborah Rohm

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AU - Kelly, Kathleen

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