Nuclei isolation and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy for examining nucleoporin alterations in human neurodegeneration

Alyssa N. Coyne, Jeffrey D. Rothstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a complex macromolecular structure comprised of multiple copies of ~30 different nucleoporin proteins (Nups). Collectively, these Nups function to regulate genome organization, gene expression, and nucleocytoplasmic transport (NCT). Recently, defects in NCT and alterations to specific Nups have been identified as early and prominent pathologies in multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's Disease (AD)/ Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), and Huntington's Disease (HD). Advances in both light and electron microscopy allow for a thorough examination of sub-cellular structures, including the NPC and its Nup constituents, with increased precision and resolution. Of the commonly used techniques, super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) affords the unparalleled opportunity to study the localization and expression of individual Nups using conventional antibody-based labeling strategies. Isolation of nuclei prior to SIM enables the visualization of individual Nup proteins within the NPC and nucleoplasm in fully and accurately reconstructed 3D space. This protocol describes a procedure for nuclei isolation and SIM to evaluate Nup expression and distribution in human iPSC-derived CNS cells and postmortem tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere62789
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2021
Issue number175
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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