Normalization of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities after neurosyphilis therapy: Does HIV status matter?

Christina M. Marra, Clare L. Maxwell, Lauren Tantalo, Molly Eaton, Anne Marie Rompalo, Charles Raines, Bradley P. Stoner, James J. Corbett, Michael Augenbraun, Mark Zajackowski, Romina Kee, Sheila A. Lukehart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To identify factors that affect normalization of laboratory measures after treatment for neurosyphilis, 59 subjects with neurosyphilis underwent repeated lumbar punctures and venipunctures after completion of therapy. The median duration of follow-up was 6.9 months. Stepwise Cox regression models were used to determine the influence of clinical and laboratory features on normalization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), white blood cells (WBCs), CSF protein concentration, CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) reactivity, and serum rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titer. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects were 2.5 times less likely to normalize CSF-VDRL reactivity than were HIV-uninfected subjects. HIV-infected subjects with peripheral blood CD4+ T cell counts of ≤200 cells/μL were 3.7 times less likely to normalize CSF-VDRL reactivity than were those with CD4 + T cell counts of >200 cells/μL. CSF WBC count and serum RPR reactivity were more likely to normalize but CSF-VDRL reactivity was less likely to normalize with higher baseline values. Future studies should address whether more intensive therapy for neurosyphilis is warranted in HIV-infected individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1006
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume38
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

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Neurosyphilis
Cerebrospinal Fluid
HIV
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Reagins
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Research
Therapeutics
Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins
T-Lymphocytes
Spinal Puncture
Phlebotomy
Serum
Leukocyte Count
Proportional Hazards Models
Leukocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Normalization of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities after neurosyphilis therapy : Does HIV status matter? / Marra, Christina M.; Maxwell, Clare L.; Tantalo, Lauren; Eaton, Molly; Rompalo, Anne Marie; Raines, Charles; Stoner, Bradley P.; Corbett, James J.; Augenbraun, Michael; Zajackowski, Mark; Kee, Romina; Lukehart, Sheila A.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 38, No. 7, 01.04.2004, p. 1001-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marra, CM, Maxwell, CL, Tantalo, L, Eaton, M, Rompalo, AM, Raines, C, Stoner, BP, Corbett, JJ, Augenbraun, M, Zajackowski, M, Kee, R & Lukehart, SA 2004, 'Normalization of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities after neurosyphilis therapy: Does HIV status matter?', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 38, no. 7, pp. 1001-1006. https://doi.org/10.1086/382532
Marra, Christina M. ; Maxwell, Clare L. ; Tantalo, Lauren ; Eaton, Molly ; Rompalo, Anne Marie ; Raines, Charles ; Stoner, Bradley P. ; Corbett, James J. ; Augenbraun, Michael ; Zajackowski, Mark ; Kee, Romina ; Lukehart, Sheila A. / Normalization of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities after neurosyphilis therapy : Does HIV status matter?. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 38, No. 7. pp. 1001-1006.
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